DO YOU HEAR THE PEOPLE SING?

DO YOU HEAR THE PEOPLE SING?

CURATED BY HEIDI LEFEBVRE, KATY B PLUMMER AND LUKE LETOURNEAU

Inspired by the many versions of Les Misérables, this exhibition encompasses a kaleidoscopic range of artistic approaches to subverting and interpreting personal and historical narratives, via high-drama, excess and passion.

Each work in the exhibition both meditates on the way our culture creates memory and intervenes in how we understand ourselves within those memories. It contains works from 15 artists in various mediums, including sculpture and video.

View the digital catalogue HERE

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

30 January – 16 February 2019
Opening Night: 30 January, 6pm
Curator’s Talk: 30 January, 5:30pm

KEY CREATIVES

Artists: Liam Benson and Cassandra Bird, Dean Cross, Beth Dillon, George Haddad, Heidi Lefebvre, Daniel Mudie Cunningham, Luke O’Connor, Katy B Plummer, Em Size, Marcia Swaby, Alexander Tanazefti, Athena Thebus, Amanda Wolf and Zoe Wong.
Curators: Heidi Lefebvre, Katy B Plummer and Luke Létourneau.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Kudos Gallery and Arc @ UNSW Art & design.
This project has been supported by the Kudos Gallery and Arc @ UNSW Art & Design.

THE ARTISTS

Liam Benson

Liam Benson is a performance artist who documents his work through embroidery, photography, video and new media. Benson’s work deconstructs the social perceptions of gender, race, culture, sexuality and identity by cross-referencing art, popular culture and media language. His work serves to celebrate the evolution of these social archetypes and explore the possibilities within the cross influence of socially entrenched identities and cultural and sub-cultural amalgamation. Liam Benson is represented by Arterial Gallery, Sydney. 

Cassandra Bird

Cassandra Bird is the Asscociate Director at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

Dean Cross

Dean Cross is a First Nations trans-disciplinary artist. He has been formally trained in both Contemporary Dance and Sculpture, and works across the sculptural and pictorial fields. Through this he attempts to re-evaluate and re-construct what it means to be Australian in the 21st Century, and how that fits within our globalised world. Dean was born and raised on Ngunnawal country, however his ancestral roots lie within the Worimi Nation.

Beth Dillon

Beth Dillon is a master of creative pursuits and time management. She’s an artist interested in the comic, the strange and the beautiful. Her work explores expressive ambiguities of the performing body, visual constructions of place and identity, and potential roles of the artist in contemporary society. Beth has travelled the world and uses photography, video, performance and installation to explore her subject matter. In addition to a bourgeoning solo career, Beth is also a founding member of a Sydney-based trio of emerging artists called 110%.

George Haddad

George Haddad is a Sydney based writer who is currently studying a Creative Arts Doctorate at Western Sydney University. His debut novella Populate and Perish was the winner of the 2016 Viva La Novella Prize.

Heidi Lefebvre

Heidi Lefebvre makes drawings, costumes, props and writes short plays. Exploring themes of performance and arts place in history, she cross references literary imagery with popular cultural. The results are installations that look olde worlde and drawings that simmer with narrative. Heidi can often be found spinning straw into gold. 

heidilefebvre.com

Daniel Mudie Cunningham

Daniel Mudie Cunningham is a Sydney-based artist, curator and cultural critic, active since the mid-1990s. His practice draws upon and remixes the image streams of art history, queer politics, pop culture, performance and music through video and performance.

Luke O’Connor

Luke O’Connor is a Sydney-based artist working in the medium of ceramics. Luke creates works that reference the utilitarian language embedded in the history of ceramics while presenting objects that are formally and functionally ambiguous. In reimagining the traditional ceramic ideology, with its peculiarities and willfulness, the artist both challenges and pays homage to the craft.

Katy B Plummer

Katy B Plummer makes video, sculpture and installations. She looks for the moment that fervent conviction and striving either ascends to glory, or tips into bathos. Basically, she likes high drama with its pants around its ankles. She tells complicated stories about love and revolution and she can often be found pretending to be some kind of animal.

katybplummer.com

Em Size

Em Size is an experimental non-fiction writer based in Sydney, currently interested in the infrastructures that shape the arts, relationships, sexuality and desire. Their interested in modes of writing that develop in the commons, as part of a feedback loop of reading and writing– most of their writing in some way references the utopian, DIY politico-poetics of fanfiction.

Marcia Swaby

Marcia Swaby is a contemporary jewelry maker working in Sydney. They recently completed a research project which culminated in the exhibition Haptic Tactility, at UNSw Art and Design. The works interpret unknown ancestors, inspired by her interpretation and interaction with ancient Taino statues housed in the British museum.

Alexander Tanazefti

Alexander Tanazefti is a Sydney based artist and designer interested in systems and their functions.

Athena Thebus

Athena Thebus’ practice spans sculpture, drawing, and writing. Her practice is driven by the desire to generate an atmosphere by which queer life is sustainable. Part of figuring that out is to make sculptures and installations that use materials that are connotative of capitalism’s excess, nuanced with past shame and queer hope. Presently, her writing practice involves feeling like a dog and swimming in other people’s waters. She is a Scorpio with a Sagittarius rising and a Capricorn moon.

Amanda Wolf

Amanda Wolf is a contemporary artist who engages with themes related to the body. The foundation of Wolf’s work lies in the process of hand sewing which is used to create large scale soft sculptures, costumes and stop motion animations. Wolf graduated with First Class Honours from the Queensland College of Art in 2013 and holds a Diploma of Fine Art from the Northern Melbourne Institute of Tafe (2005).

Zoe Wong

Zoe Wong’s practice explores her half Chinese, half Australian heritage as well as her queer identity through photographic appropriation and mixed media installations. Her work illustrates the complexities behind the influence that pop culture has on society’s notions of race and identity and how we perceive ourselves through representation in mass media. 

Luke Létourneau

Luke Létourneau is a writer and curator working in Sydney. His independent practice has engaged with screens cultures, genre, sweat, queer space and time and technological kurfuffles. In 2017-18 he sits on the management and editorial committee of Runway Australian Experimental Art Journal.

lukeletourneau.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project has been supported by the Kudos Gallery and Arc @ UNSW Art & Design.

A TREASURED PRIVATE NOTEBOOK

A TREASURED PRIVATE NOTEBOOK

BY THEA JONES AND ELLA SOWINSKA

A treasured private notebook responds to Ella Sowinska, and Thea Jones’ shared childhood experience of discovering the secret writing practices of their mothers.

Both Sowinska and Jones actively engage with their mother’s creative practices for this exhibition. Sowinska’s film, 80 Ways, is an observational video work documenting the on-set collaboration between the artist and her mother as they work together to dramatise a chapter of Sowinska’s mother’s erotic novel, written under the pseudonym Sandy Mayflower. Jones’ new work is a large scale textile installation responding to an essay written by her mother. In 2017, Jones approached her mother to write an essay to accompany a work exploring nostalgia as a coping mechanism for trauma. Hoping for a scathing review of family farm dynamics and conservative racist rural politics, she instead received a touching story about death, loss, and the function of nostalgia. This new work is hand embroidered with an excerpt of text from her mother’s essay, as well as the motif of the Paterson’s Curse invasive weed. Paterson’s Curse covers the landscape surrounding Thea’s mother’s childhood home with a blanket of purple flowers. It has been an ongoing theme in Jones’s recent works as a representational motif for European colonisation, and a subsequent critical investigation and deconstruction of her own role in this as a white woman.

 

View the digital catalogue HERE

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

27 February 2019 – 16 March 2019
Opening
27 February, 6pm
Artist Talk
27 February, 5:30pm

KEY CREATIVES

Artists: Thea Jones and Ella Sowinska

Essays by Rosie Funder and Diego Ramirez will accompany this exhibition.

Image Credit: 80 Ways (still) by Ella Sowinska, 2018. Image courtesy the artist.

THE ARTISTS

Ella Sowinska

Ella Sowinska is an artist and filmmaker whose work is guided by the theoretical discourses of documentary and reality television. Working predominately in video, installation and occasionally performance, Ella addresses the impact that the constructed situation has upon these social relationships. Her work explores the power dynamics between director or artist and actor, participant or contestant by drawing attention to the often-constructed situation. Recent projects have been concerned with the representation of intimacy and desire in non-fiction screen based works from a queer perspective. Ella graduated with an Honours degree in fine art from MADA at Monash University in 2013, and a Masters degree in film and television from The Victorian College of the Arts in 2018. Ella lives and works in Naarm Melbourne on the unceded sovereign land of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation.

ellasowinska.com

Thea Jones

Thea Jones is an artist with a background in philosophy. She is broadly interested in post-structuralism and theories of language, particularly through a feminist lens. She often utilises textiles and traditional craft techniques to explore these themes. Recent projects have responded to folklore and amateur rural histories surrounding the region in NSW where her maternal family has lived for over 100 years. Recent exhibitions include: Jane’s Salvation (Paterson’s Curse) at TCB, 2017; nul at Bus Projects, 2017; and Everything Spring, curated by Julia Murphy at The Honeymoon Suite, 2017.

thea-jones.com

Rosie Funder

Rosie Funder is a non-fiction writer. Her work has been published in the Griffith Review, the Lifted Brow and un Magazine. In 2018 she was a Griffith Review fellow.
Rosie is a guest speaker at the artist talk on 27 February 5:30pm, and also contributed a catalogue essay. 

Diego Ramirez

Diego Ramirez is an artist and writer interested in terror as a response to the Other. He has held solo exhibitions and individual screenings locally and internationally at the Australian Centre for The Moving Image; MARS Gallery; and Perth Centre for Contemporary Photography. Group shows include Art Central Hong Kong; Torrance Art Museum; WRO Media Art Biennale; Hong-Gah Museum; and Careof. Ramirez’s writing features in A+a: Art and Australia; Runway Journal; and Critical Contemporary Culture Journal. He co-edited the booklet *dumb brunette vol.1. Ramirez is represented by MARS Gallery.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

LOVE ME, LOVE ME

LOVE ME, LOVE ME

BY OLIVIA LACEY

Love Me, Love Me engages with romantic dialogues as examples of intersubjective language that are repeatedly played out across pop cultural formats. The central work in the exhibition, Give Me All Your Love (2019), consists of an appropriated lyric from a love song, re-presented as an installation of hand-punched confetti suspended between clear acrylic letters. Installed alongside balloons and streamers, the confetti aims to capture a moment in time and evoke the simultaneous feelings of anticipation and disappointment that are associated with confessions of love. The work appropriates lyrics in order to explore ambiguity around the subjects of romantic confession in popular music: who is being addressed? In their open meaning these lyrics become an opportunity for the projection of our own desires.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

27 Feb – 16 March 2019
Opening 27 Feb 6pm – 8pm

Hero image credit: Confetti by Olivia Lacey, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Olivia Lacey

Olivia Lacey employs processes of transcription and translation to explore the ambiguities, slippages or humour that can arise in interpersonal interactions. Her works combine referents appropriated from art historical texts, pop music lyrics and everyday conversations in order to examine romantic dialogue as an intersubjective space of exchange. These explorations are primarily realised as multi-channel video works and wall-based text installations. She frequently employs party decorations, disco lighting and reflective materials in order to evoke the immersive spaces of karaoke rooms. Lacey graduated from a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) at the Queensland University of Technology in 2017. In 2018, she completed a residency with 3331 Arts Chiyoda in Tokyo. Recent group exhibitions include Future Proof (2018), Boxcopy Contemporary Art Space; Hatched: National Graduate Show (2018), Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts; and Maybe We Could Meet Again (2018), 3331 Arts Chiyoda.

Artist website: olivialacey.com.au

REAGAN KELLY by Lewis Treston

REAGAN KELLY by Lewis Treston

CO-PRESENTED WITH ROCKET BOY ENSEMBLE

Tim Hill directs award winning playwright Lewis Treston’s quintessentially Brisbane show that Queensland audiences have never seen.

Everyone is telling former school captain Reagan Kelly that she should get a degree, get a job, get married and do the whole ‘life’ thing… but what do they really know about life? Her parents are getting divorced, her brother is dating a creep, even her gay best friend has lost his sparkle. But, when Reagan wakes up next to a nineteen year old nice guy, she begins to wonder if she should start playing by the rules or whether it’s always better to set the things that ‘matter’ ablaze.

Reagan Kelly is a bitterly hysterical comedy about trying to find meaning when life has stopped making sense.

KEY CREATIVES

Lewis Treston – Playwright
Tim Hill – Director
Danielle Carney – Producer

Jessica Palfrey – Designer
Shea Hines – Assistant Designer
Shannon Maugham – Stage Manager

CAST
Emily Carr, Chris Kellett, Elise Greig, Jeremiah Wray, Lisa Huynh, Fraser Crane & Jackson McGovern. 

Image by Matthew Doueal.

DATES

20 March – 30 March 2019

This event has passed. Tickets are no longer on sale. 

ARTISTS

Rocket Boy Ensemble

Rocket Boy Ensemble is a Brisbane based group of like-minded artists whose vision is to create opportunities for artists of varying disciplines to collaborate together on new Australian work, from traditional narrative driven theatre to innovative performance events. Our past projects include Romeo & Juliet, Pre- Drinks by Lewis Treston, a creative development of ‘That Vagina Play’ as apart of HOTA’s Indie season and most recently a new experimental work ‘A Toast to Joni’ has received its first development in Brisbane.​

Lewis Treston

Lewis is an award-winning emerging playwright based in Queensland. This year his new comedy Meat Eaters received a Rough Draft development at the Sydney Theatre Company. His Patrick White Award winning comedy Hot Tub was commissioned by ATYP as a part of their writer in residence program and was also presented as a moved reading as a part of the La Boite HWY festival. Follow Me Home was commissioned by ATYP in conjunction with ACYP and will premier at Riverside Theatres in 2019. His short play The Arcade was presented as a part of Intersection at ATYP and published by Currency Press. In 2015 his play Reagan Kelly was produced by NIDA as a graduation piece and was subsequently shortlisted for Belvoir’s Philip Parsons Fellowship. Other plays and screenplays include Pre-Drinks, Anita Elizabeth Jensen, Fireworks and Blood & Tinsel. He is a graduate from both NIDA and QUT. 

TIM HILL

B.A. Griffith University, ATCL Trinity College London, MFA Directing NIDA 

Timothy Hill is a freelance director of musical theatre, plays, cabaret, dance and film. In 2015 he completed a Masters of Fine Arts Directing at NIDA under the tutorship of Dr. Egil Kipste). Currently directing Spring Awakening (Underground Broadway) and Bang Bang: Featuring Ronda Burchmore  (TAM Presents/Brisbane Festival). Recent directing credits include sold out production of Wheel of Fortune (Metro Arts/TAM Presents) Rent (QPAC/Matt Ward Entertainment) This Is Our Youth (Underground Broadway) Rent (Matt Ward Entertainment/Powerhouse) new Australian Musical Showtrain (Federation University) and Mary Poppins (Arts Centre Gold Coast) Into The Woods (The Performers Studio/Arts Centre Gold Coast), Cabaret, A Cabaret (The Performers Studio). Other career highlights include; for Raw Metal: Metalworx (Writer/Assistant Director), Amped (Writer/Assistant Director), Funky Beats (Writer/Director – critically acclaimed national tour) and in Melbourne: From The Inside (Co-Director – Industry Dance), Evolution of Love (Collaboration – Writer/Co-Director), Time: A Story Of Youth (Project Y Writer/Co- Director) Electric Avenue (Troy Armstrong) Twist and Turns (Oscar Theatre Company – Director) and Off/On (Oscar Theatre Company – Director) Spring Awakening (Nida – Director). His directorial work in film includes: film clip Gold for Triple J unearthed artist Donatachi in 2015. As assistant director Stranger I Am (NIDA- Craig Ilott) As dramaturg Left Behind & Uninvited Guest (Merge Dance Theatre). As a teacher he has conducted his acting, acting for musical theatre, theatre and production classes at leading training and tertiary institutions around the country.

DANIELLE CARNEY

Danielle is a Brisbane based producer and director. She is a co-founder of Rocket Boy Ensemble a collective specialising in event based immersive theatre. Most recently she produced and directed a new work, A TOAST TO JONI (2018).

Her credits include: PRE-DRINKS by Lewis Treston for (Rocket Boy Ensemble 2013 and Anywhere Theatre Festival 2014) RETAIL THERAPY by Cassandra Waterford (Wonderland Festival 2016), Ragtime (Anywhere Theatre Festival 2016), CONNECT FOUR by Alanya Bridge (Harvest Rain and Home of the Arts 2015), 25th ANNUAL PUTNAM SPELLING BEE (Underground Productions 2014), OASIS: THE MUSICAL by Bradley McCaw (2 High Festival – mentored by Sue Rider 2015), FAT/SNOB by Lewis Treston (Short and Sweet 2015), THE ART OF CONVERSATION by David Steward (Short and Sweet Festival, winner: Best Comedy award 2013) Romeo and Juliet for Rocket Boy Ensemble (Rocket Boy 2012). She also had the privilege of working with some of Queensland’s most accomplished artists as apart of OPERA QUEENSLAND’s OPEN STAGES program in 2015 and 2016.

YAAD KARO

YAAD KARO

BY SHIVANJANI LAL

Yaad Karo: To remember, to stitch together and piece fragments of history for both collective and individual remembrance. To recenter knowledge, to account for colonial and personal histories. To allow something invisible to become visible. To hold space for ancestors – past, present and future.

Yaad Karo is a new work by Shivanjani Lal which looks at the history of migration that links her personal history to the indentured labour communities of India and the Pacific. Through a process-driven practice that uses labour as a tool to account for the trajectories of labour across oceans, Lal uses stitching to create visible links that record the journeys made by her community and herself: connecting and remaking the lines of connection. In looking at shipping documents and in using a map which centres Australia between these oceans, she reframes this history by acknowledging the role of Australia as the localised colonial presence.

 

View the digital catalogue HERE.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

27 March – 13 April 2019
Opening Night:
27 March 6pm
Artist talk:
13 April 3pm, in conversation with Sancintya Mohini Simpson

Image credit: Yaad Karo by Shivanjani Lal, 2017. Image courtesy of the artist.

ARTIST

Shivanjani Lal

Shivanjani Lal is a twice removed Fijian Indian Australian artist whose history is intrinsically linked to the indentured labour diaspora of Asia and the Pacific. She works across mediums to explore her cultural dislocation, which seeks to account for memory, erasure, healing, and the archive.

Currently Lal uses spatial and material activations along with video to create documents which analyse her personal narratives in the broader context of the social history which brought her family from India to Fiji and now to Australia. This is done in an effort to redefine the history of the Indo-Fijian Community away from the narratives produced by the current political climate in both Fiji and India.

Her current research posits that history has obliterated and obfuscated the communal memory of her community but that her body and the landscapes she is from hold onto both.

Artist website: shivanjani-lal.tumblr.com

PAINTINGS

PAINTINGS

BY CHRISTINE MORROW

Christine Morrow produces multi-part painted configurations out of canvases that fasten together by means of zippers. Each component is a monochrome canvas in the tradition of reductive painting (Formalism and Minimalism). However, the accumulative work exploits the material qualities of the painter’s canvas and stretcher frame to create dynamic, three-dimensional modular structures.

Morrow’s theoretical concern is with the history of painting in the West after the late 19th century. Throughout Modernism, painting has reinstated a relationship of mutuality with the gallery wall by cultivating flatness and seriality, thereby internalising the conditions of the wall on which it is shown. Morrow carves a new space for reductive painting that embraces both acceptance and denial of gallery walls as painting’s architectural support and it’s symbolic condition or governing logic.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

27 March – 13 April 2019

THE ARTIST

Christine Morrow

Christine Morrow has held exhibitions in London, Rome and Edinburgh. In Australia, she has participated in group and solo exhibitions at Metro Arts (Brisbane), ACCA (Melbourne), CAST (Hobart), IMA (Brisbane), Performance Space (Sydney), West Space (Melbourne) and in the Adelaide Biennial (Art Gallery of South Australia). She was a finalist in the Moet and Chandon prize and a previous winner (overall) of both the Churchie Prize for emerging art and the Logan Art Award. She has undertaken international residencies through the AGNSW, the Australia Council and the Accademia Britannica; and domestic residencies at Gertrude Contemporary (Melbourne) and Artspace (Sydney).

Morrow co-founded and co-directed Blindside artist-run space in Melbourne. She curated the Australian artists for the Tenth Havana Biennial (Cuba). She has curated for institutions (Museum of Contemporary Art Sydney, Victorian Arts Centre Melbourne and Verge Gallery Sydney) as well as for festivals including the Melbourne International Festival and the Brisbane Festival.

This is Pep Too!

This is Pep Too!

BY HAILEY ATKINS

In This is Pep Too! Hailey Atkins presents a body of new sculptural works and drawings that revise the meaning of ‘pep’ to incorporate the reality of failure and anxiety. Drawing on the personal and borrowing from the everyday, Atkins uses playful colour and form to articulate experiences that occur at the intersection of failure, doubt and defiant enthusiasm. Where naïve motivational rhetoric marches blindly forward, and smirking satire marches stubbornly on the spot, the work in This Is Pep Too! huffs and huddles and meanders. It thrusts its hand skyward and just as quickly retracts and takes cover. It offers an alternate version of the world where the awkwardness and absurdity of ‘not-knowing’ is embraced and expectation is given the flick.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS:
There will also be additional FREE events on 18th May as part of BAD 2019, including an artist talk and screening – ALL WELCOME!

Screening of Postcard eXotica by Diego Ramirez / Saturday 18th May, 1pm in Metro Arts Gallery 2
Postcard eXotica is a 30 minute cinematic re-enactment of a collection of vintage American postcards produced circa 1900-1930s that depict Mexican stereotypes. The work seeks to think through the Western gaze by approaching the pictures as movie scenes and revealing the condition of their making – particularly the way they are scripted, staged, lit and filmed. In a broader manner, the video pastiches early cinema, contemporary pop and horror to trace the ways in which these ideas manifest today.

Artist Talks / Saturday 18th May, 2-3pm in Metro Arts Gallery
Meet and hear from the studio artists and visiting artists at Metro Arts. Join Hailey Atkins for a casual tour of her exhibition and hear about the ideas and processes that inform her practice. Following the tour, join local artist Anastasia Booth, and visiting Melbourne-based artist Diego Ramirez as part of an in-conversation series.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

8 May – 25 May 2019

Image credit: Trophy for potato by Hailey Atkins, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Hailey Atkins

 

Hailey is a Brisbane based sculptural artist. She graduated at Queensland College of Art in 2016 (Bachelor of Fine Art, Hons – Class I) and has since exhibited frequently in Queensland, as well as interstate (Sydney, Hobart) and internationally (Utrecht, Rotterdam, NL) and is currently represented by har.art in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Hailey was selected as a finalist of Churchie Emerging Art Prize in 2018 and is co- founder and director of Wreckers Artspace in Brisbane.

 

Artist Website: haileyatkins.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We’re BAD | This event is part of BRISBANE ART DESIGN (BAD) 2019, an initiative of Museum of Brisbane.

MARS Video Exchange  

MARS Video Exchange  

BY STEPHEN HALEY, HANNAH RAISIN AND DIEGO RAMIREZ

As part of an exchange with Melbourne-based gallery MARS, Metro Arts will present the work of three innovative Melbourne video artists: Stephen Haley, Hannah Raisin and Diego Ramirez, and curated by Amanda Camp. In November 2019, a selection of Brisbane artists, curated by Metro Arts, will be exhibited in the Black Box, the dedicated video projection space at MARS, Melbourne.

The four video works exhibited at Metro Arts, by three distinctive artists, are united by an interest in our physical environments. Stephen Haley’s new video work Fugue State(2019) uses computer-generated modelling to fly-through abstractions of shopping centres, cityscapes and housing development. In contrast to the disembodied gaze of Haley’s work, Hannah Raisin and Diego Ramirez emphasises bodily engagements with our surroundings. Raisin’s works Soak I and SOAK II show the artist traversing a waterfall, before plunging into the water, capturing the visceral enveloping of the body by the environment. Ramirez’s work, aXolotl’s Happiness, again emphasises the body, and the banality of our interactions within the domestic space, even as this body enters the realm of the fantastic.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS:
There will also be additional FREE events on 18th May as part of BAD 2019, including an artist talk and screening – ALL WELCOME!

Screening of Postcard eXotica by Diego Ramirez / Saturday 18th May, 1pm in Metro Arts Gallery 2
Postcard eXotica is a 30 minute cinematic re-enactment of a collection of vintage American postcards produced circa 1900-1930s that depict Mexican stereotypes. The work seeks to think through the Western gaze by approaching the pictures as movie scenes and revealing the condition of their making – particularly the way they are scripted, staged, lit and filmed. In a broader manner, the video pastiches early cinema, contemporary pop and horror to trace the ways in which these ideas manifest today.

Artist Talks / Saturday 18th May, 2-3pm in Metro Arts Gallery
Meet and hear from the studio artists and visiting artists at Metro Arts. Join Hailey Atkins for a casual tour of her exhibition and hear about the ideas and processes that inform her practice. Following the tour, join local artist Anastasia Booth, and visiting Melbourne-based artist Diego Ramirez as part of an in-conversation series.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

8 May – 25 May 2019

Image credit: Diego Ramirez. ‘Postcard eXotica’ 2016. HD Video 30 minutes Edition of 5 + 2AP. Courtesy the artist and MARS (Melbourne).

THE ARTISTS

Hannah Raisin

After completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Victorian College of the Arts in 2007, Hannah Raisin returned for Honours in 2012. For a decade she has continued to engage her playful and subversive performance based practice in numerous group shows, solo exhibitions and other forums throughout Australia. In 2013 and 2014 Raisin was the recipient of Art Start and New Work Grants from the Australia Council, which funded a self-directed arts program throughout various locations in regional and urban Australia. In early 2017, Raisin undertook an Asialink Arts residency to Bangalore, India where she produced the video work Spectrum. Raisin has recently been curated into group show Unfinished Buisness: Perspectives on Art and Feminism at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) with her video work‘Fold.

Stephen Haley

Stephen Haley is a painter and digital media artist who has an extensive exhibition history – both nationally and internationally – and has won a number of national art prizes for painting. Selected awards and research grants include Australia Council’s New Work Grant, their LA Residency, an Arts Vic Project Grant, and most recently The Rupert Bunny Fellowship in 2016. Haley is also a writer and is published in a wide range of forums.

Diego Ramirez

Diego Ramirez is an emerging multidisciplinary artist and writer. He works primarily with video and other forms of media in the pursuit of developing installation projects for gallery contexts. His research based practice seeks to reconfigure representations of racial difference in lens based media. Ramirez’s most recent work is prompted by found images that embody the fear and desire that characterises projections of the Other. Indeed, his research interests are currently being developed in two streams of practice; delegated performances scripted for cinematic videos and pictures produced with vector graphics. The first attempts to think through the way in which the body is staged and the latter the manner in which it is designed. Neither idealist nor entirely cynical, the artist’s goal is to scramble the script that dictates power relations in visual culture. Ramirez’s method is best described as active reading, a calculated effort to generate alternative and counter readings of dominant texts. This methodology intends to provoke moments of recognition in which the mechanisms of the text become apparent and null.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We’re BAD | This event is part of BRISBANE ART DESIGN (BAD) 2019, an initiative of Museum of Brisbane.

KILL CLIMATE DENIERS by David Finnigan

KILL CLIMATE DENIERS by David Finnigan

CO-PRESENTED WITH THAT PRODUCTION COMPANY

Join the call to arms if you dare, as a militant cell of eco-activists takes the audience hostage during a concert at Parliament House. The demand is simple: Australia is to immediately cease all carbon emissions and coal exports or they’ll start executing their 1,700 hostages.

But they’re not the only ones to take the title literally. Between scenes of bloody action and banging 90’s tunes, writer David Finnigan discusses the outrage the play’s title provoked from Andrew Bolt and his cabal of conservative bloggers. The original production was shut down in the ensuing shitstorm, leading Finnigan to eventually fold the scandal into the play.

Kill Climate Deniers is a controversial take on the climate change ‘debate’, in Australia. It’s a play written within a play, an action film inside a documentary, a satire inside a rave, and now it’s set to explode here in the Sunshine State.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Kill Climate Deniers was first produced by Griffin Theatre Company, in January 2018 at the SBW Stables Theatre.

MORE INFORMATION

Unsure if Kill Climate Deniers is right for you? Click HERE for some more information from THAT Production Company that might help! 

ONLINE PROGRAM

Click HERE to download the online program for Kill Climate Deniers!

KEY CREATIVES

Timothy Wynn: Director
Cassandra Ramsay: Creative Producer
Playwright: David Finnigan
Liam Lowth: Assistant Director
Aaron Dora: Assistant Producer

Featuring:
Clementine Anderson, Julie Cotterell, Stephanie Elliott, Asabi Goodman, Caitlin Hill, Ella Macrokanis, Charlene Masters, Georgia Politakis and Jessica Veurman.

Image by Matthew Doueal.

DATES

15 – 25 May 2019

This event has passed. Tickets are no longer on sale. 

THE ARTIST

THAT Production Company

THAT: (Demonstrative pronoun) A person, thing or idea as pointed out as present, but in reference to a person, thing or idea before mentioned.

THAT Production Company is an independent theatre company based in Ipswich, Queensland. Artistic Director Timothy Wynn and Creative Producer Cassandra Ramsay have been curating, collaborating and creating a range of theatrical experiences since 2009, with over 15 plays (including the Australian premiere of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Ruined by Lynn Nottage; When the Rain Stops Falling by Andrew Bovell; A Lie of the Mind by Sam Shepard; Yielding by Emma Workman) and over 30 other events (including play-readings, workshops, public interviews, installations, film screenings, poetry readings and more) produced under the THAT Production Company banner.

www.thatproductioncompany.com.au

MAGPIE

MAGPIE

BY ELISE GREIG
A METRO ARTS, PLAYLAB AND EG PRODUCTION

Mordecai, a novelist dealing with a bad review, returns to her family’s Brisbane home for the first time in decades following the death of her father. The home conjures echoes from her distant past: the muggy summers, the smell of rotting mangoes, and the perpetual arguments between her Romani mother and father.

When she discovers her old journal – an innocent tapestry of ideas, drawings, and imaginings – Mordecai is drawn back to 1961 and a long-abandoned investigation into her parent’s unhappiness. Pushed along by her childhood friend Splinter, Mordecai sets out to uncover the long dormant secrets that cursed her family and led to her leaving home at fifteen.

Spanning from young love to aging cynicism, Magpie is a coming-of-age story that will thrill and delight like lemonade ice-blocks and a swim on a hot day.

 

ONLINE PROGRAM

Click HERE to download the online program for Magpie!

KEY CREATIVES

Ian Lawson – Director and Dramaturg
Elise Greig – Playwright
Josh McIntosh – Designer
David Walters – LX Designer
Guy Webster – Sound Designer
Barb Lowing – Performer
Kathryn Marquet – Performer
Julian Curtis – Performer
Michael Mandalios – Performer
Luisa Prosser – Voiceover Artist

Image by Simon Lowing. 

DATES

29 May – 8 June 2019

WHERE

Brisbane Powerhouse

ARTISTS

Elise Greig

Elise has been recognized by the Matilda Awards on three occasions for her outstanding contribution to Queensland Theatre. She is an acting graduate from USQ and an Honours and Masters graduate from QUT, where she was awarded the University Medal. Elise also trained with Shakespeare & Company in Boston, USA, and has received three Goldie Awards for her voice over work.  During 2017 Elise received a CentreScreen Award for her performance in the short film, Good Girls, which was screened at the Short Film Corner at Cannes Film Festival and New Filmmakers Festival in New York.

As an actor, Elise’s theatre credits include Swallow (Metro LCL); Spectate (Metro); Long Gone Lonesome Cowgirls (La Boite/QBFM); The Spirit of The Land (La Boite); Secret Bridesmaids’ Business (La Boite/QPAC); The Mayne Inheritance (La Boite); The Year Nick McGowan Came to Stay (La Boite); Explosions (QTC); Summer Rain (QTC); Modd Madame Butterfly (QTC); Sweet Phoebe, TwoClark In Sarajevo (La Boite); Alive at Williamstown PierJerusalemOleannaThe Big Picture, The Maids (Green); The Vagina Monologues (Green at Gardens Theatre) and Hopelessly Devoted (Glen Street, Sydney). Elise is currently the voice of Mrs. Kangaroo in Peppa Pig.

As a playwright, Elise was supported by Arts Queensland and The Australia Council to develop her first play, The Romany Project, as part of Metro’s Year of Independents. This was followed by Elise’s first full-length play, Crèche and Burn, which was a box office and critical success as part of La Boite’s 2005 mainhouse season and received a 10-week national tour. Her next play, The Sweet Science of Bruising, was shortlisted for the 2010 Playwriting Australia Festival. This was followed by Hopelessly Devoted (Glen Street, Sydney), Flood (Short+Sweet) and All Aboard!, co-written for Bleach*2016.  Her current play, Magpie, has been developed through Playlab’s Lab Rats and Beta Testing.

Artist website: http://elisegreig.com/

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Metro Arts and Magpie are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body. Metro Arts, Playlab and Magpie are supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland, part of the Department of Environment and Science. Metro Arts is proudly supported by Brisbane City Council. Magpie is supported by Creative Partnerships Australia through MATCH Lab. Developed by Playlab.

 

 

LIFE ON EARTH

LIFE ON EARTH

BY EMMA LINDSAY

Life on Earth recreates the artist’s intense moments with wild species, encountered during global fieldtrips to desert, Arctic, reef and museum sites between 2011-2018.

Emma Lindsay grew up believing that environments untouched by humanity still existed on Earth, based on David Attenborough’s nature TV documentaries. Later, the artist was heartbroken to learn Attenborough’s ‘Nature’ was an aesthetic camera-constructed illusion, with all traces of humans carefully edited out of the frame. Lindsay reframes Life on Earth to include her observations of the sixth mass extinction crisis, climate change, and the ongoing impact of unlimited human activities on the Biosphere.

The exhibition will offer conversations about biodiversity and geographic zones at risk of disappearing, utilizing a diverse range of art media: an invitation to consider care and complicity in the intersection between art, science, culture, and all Life on Earth.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

5 June – 15 June 2019
Artist Talk: Saturday, 15 June 3pm

Image credit: Borderlines by Emma Lindsay, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Emma Lindsay

Dr Emma Lindsay is a visual artist and occasional curator. Lindsay’s paintings and interdisciplinary projects explore personal encounters with threatened, endangered and extinct species and the impact of human culture and activities upon their habitats and existence during this time of the Anthropocene.

Overall winner of the 2016 Moreton Bay Art Awards, Lindsay has been a finalist in the Sunshine Coast Art Prize, Churchie Emerging Art Award, Redlands Westpac Art Prize, and the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize. The artist has been awarded residencies with: BAER Art Centre Artist Center (Iceland); Bathurst Regional Art Gallery Hill End Murray’s Cottage Residency, and Point B Worklodge (New York). Since 2009 she has also been awarded major grants from the Australia Council, Australian American Association, Arts Queensland, Brisbane City Council, and an RMIT Post-Graduate scholarship. Lindsay’s work is held in public and private collections in Australia and internationally.

Artist website: www.emmalindsay.com

WE KOPPEL, WE DALA

WE KOPPEL, WE DALA

BY ROBERTA RICH

We Koppel, We Dala presents narratives of southern African origins that explore concepts of identity, migration, self-determination and representation. Painful artefacts remind us of oppressive histories and their ongoing impacts. Apartheid continues. Disguised globally. Framed within South African Apartheid history, the exhibition seeks to consider adjacent histories of colonialism such as that of so-called ‘Australia’ and its own histories of segregation, and to acknowledge this.

We Koppel, We Dala explores personal relationships within these histories, by occupying significant sites of reclamation and loss: the mountains where Khoi and San ancestors traversed; memorials of the 76’ youth uprisings; sites of removed colonial statues; and visiting former family residences. Fist thrust into the air, the artist acknowledges connection to place and history. The plight of residents of District Six and many other communities who were displaced as a result of South Africa’s Group Areas Act, continues 50 years on, though not in silence. Because we must koppel, we must dala.

WHERE

Gallery

WHEN

26 June – 13 July 2019

Image credit: M/otherLand by RobertaRich, 2018. Image by Lyndon Campbell

THE ARTIST

Roberta Rich

Roberta Rich draws from historical, socio-political, media and popular culture to engage with notions of ‘authenticity’, its relationship to constructed identities, and their forms of representation. In doing so, Rich aims to de-construct colonial modalities through arts practice while ascertaining empowering forms of self-determination, often referencing her diaspora African identity and experiences.

Since completing her MFA at Monash University (2013), Rich has exhibited projects in Melbourne, interstate and across Johannesburg and Cape Town. Recent solo shows include: Bubblegum Club  (Johannesburg, 2016); Blak Dot Gallery (Melbourne, 2017); Next Wave Festival (Arts House, 2018); Bus Projects (2018), and group exhibitions at Wits Art Museum (Johannesburg, 2017); Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (Western Cape, 2017); Firstdraft, (Sydney, 2018), and Gallery MOMO (Cape Town, 2018). Rich is an alumni of Footscray Community Art Centre’s Emerging Cultural Leaders Program. Rich’s recent residencies in South Africa were supported by NAVA’s Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship for Emerging Artists.

Artist website: www.robertajoyrich.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

M/other Land is supported by Next Wave and the City of Melbourne through Arts House. The project was assisted by The Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship. The program is administered by the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA). 

THE BOY DIVER

THE BOY DIVER

BY ALEX PYREN

The Boy Diver continues Alex Pyren’s interest in playfully reflecting on lived experiences, reconstructing and transforming encounters from their childhood and moments from their daily life. Here, the artist returns to their tenth birthday party, where they would find a treasure at the bottom of a public pool: a $1 coin. The exhibition focuses, not on obtaining the coin, but on reaching for it and the potentiality of this moment of endeavour and expectation. As the coin’s glint is followed through the water, the uncertainty of the moment suggests a flow of energies, yet to be regulated, that have unrestricted potential.  The artist’s body is implied in this recreation of a memory but is not made concrete, and also inhabits this shifting ground of potential, rather than certainty. The exhibition’s traces do not monumentalise the event.  Instead, the distorted lens of the water emphasises the shifting ground of memory, and the work inhabits the uncertain interstice between the real and imagined.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

26 June – 13 July 2019

Image credit: The Boy Diver by Alex Pyren, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Alex Pyren

Alex Pyren is a Brisbane based interdisciplinary artist who works across sculpture, installation, video and drawing. Their practice is informed by methods and theories of play and the whimsical, queer theory and lived experience.

Alex is interested in playfully exploring invocations of the body in relation to objects and spatial-temporal events and interrogating the visibility and interferences of queer identities in private and public space.

Artist website: www.alexpyren.com

FLASH LIGHTS IN LOW VISIBILITY

FLASH LIGHTS IN LOW VISIBILITY

BY NICHOLETE BROCCHI

Flash Lights in Low Visibility investigates the detachment of incarcerated members of our community, who are never returned to full citizenship.  The exhibition is concerned with the way that the legal framework and isolation of prison reproduces specific individualizing and moralizing systems. Heightened rates of Indigenous and transgender incarceration undermine the validity of these systems. In considering these imbalances, the work also draws attention to the organization of space as a force for policing binaries, and for determining both the hyper-visibility and the invisibility of non-binary individuals. 

 

View the digital catalogue HERE

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

July 24 –  August 10 2019

Image credit: Image courtesy of the artist.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS

ARTIST TALK / Saturday 10 August, 3pm

PUBLIC PROGRAM / Saturday 10 August, 4pm
Please note this event has been rescheduled to Sat 10 August 4pm. We apologise for any inconvenience.

Expanding on the themes of the exhibition, the Queer College of Art will be joined in conversation with Samantha Pilkington and Emil Canita. Queer College of Art is an informal, community-driven space, which welcomes all participants in a supportive environment. 

THE ARTIST

Nicholete Brocchi


Nicholete Brocchi is a Meanjin (Brisbane) based artist working predominantly with installation, video and sculptural assemblage. Their practice operates within a post-natural matrix wherein no element of the cognitive or material realm is fixed or permanent. Their experimentation across this range of media highlights the inherent plasticity of sex and gender identity by contributing to feminist narratives from a queer perspective. Recent installations attempt to expose the private sphere as a site of heterosexual privilege and queer oppression. Demanding the right to speak as no one in particular, their intimate and vulnerable explorations of identity transcend the limits of the personal and the particular in an effort to look to new modes of queer representation.

Artist website: nicholasbrocchi.com

SILICA

SILICA

BY GRACE BLAKE

Silica is an exhibition by Grace Blake that explores hypothetical bodies. Considering silicon dioxide – a compound found in various living things – as a common thread connecting ancient and future organic, artificial and hybridised life on earth, this exhibition seeks to establish commonality between human and nonhuman beings. Drawing from non correlationist thought and new perspectives on ecology, as discussed by Donna Haraway, Timothy Morton and Steven Shaviro, this exhibition acts to extrapolate a near post anthropocene future where human ruins house new life. By removing the human as central to the exploration of the present and future experience of life on earth, Silica will strive to craft a speculative reality and examine what is compelling about creating science fiction futures.   

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

24 July – 10 August 2019

Image credit: Cuts by Grace Blake, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Grace Blake

Grace Blake is an emerging digital media and installation artist based in Canberra. Central to her practice is the tension between the virtual and tangible, developed by using 3D modelling and editing software to generate hypothetical architecture and objects, which are increasingly placed within accompanying installations. Using a number of digital and fabrication technologies, Blake considers her cross disciplinary practice an act of creating speculative realities and questions what is compelling about creating science fiction futures. While studying at ANU school of Art and Design, Blake has exhibited extensively in Sydney and Canberra and is the programs manager of Canberra-based ARI Tributary projects.

LOVE AND INFORMATION by Caryl Churchill

LOVE AND INFORMATION by Caryl Churchill

CO-PRESENTED WITH ROBERT THE CAT

A contemporary masterpiece by one of the most important playwrights working today. In 58 short scenes and with over 120 characters, the play is a dazzling collage that looks at the way we communicate and interact as human beings in a contemporary world of information overload and anxiety.

The timeless and dazzling music of Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” provides a path through this theatrical tour de force.

Scenes of tragedy, humour, banality and mystery as well as a constant stream of sometimes recognizable and often strange slices of life, examine how we process information, how we remember, create meaning, and seek love and understanding.

KEY CREATIVES

Lisa O’Neill – Director
Anatoly Frusin – Director
Rosalind Williams – Voice Coach
Geoff Squires – Lighting Designer

Actors;
Zac Boulton, Katy Cotter, Amy Hauser, Caitlin Hill, Calum Johnston, Darcy Jones, Patrick Mu’a, Chelsea O’Brien, Paige Poulier & Peter Wood

Image by Matthew Doueal.

DATES

31 July – 10 August 2019

This event has passed. Tickets are no longer on sale. 

DIGITAL PROGRAM

View the online program HERE

CHAT WITH THE CAT!

In the lead up to the show, find out some useful ‘information’ and feel the ‘love’… follow the actors as they post daily blogs about their characters and scenes including creative writings, reflections, research and facts!
https://www.robertthecattheatre.com/blog-1

THE ARTIST

Robert the Cat

 

Robert the Cat (RTC) is a new theatre collective headed by Lisa O’Neill and Anatoly Frusin (directors), and Rosalind Williams (vocal coach). Together, they have directed and taught within the acting program at TAFE Queensland for over a decade; and maintained a wide range of national and international creative practice across many theatrical platforms and genres.

For the past 10 years they have had the pleasure of working with apprentice actors within an educational setting, developing contemporary works that are highly crafted and marked by an emotional intensity, physicality and theatricality.

The Robert the Cat collective has been established to take the work of these practitioners to a broader public, provide the many talented graduates from the course with a platform to continue their theatre practice, and create an opportunity to showcase their skilled work as emerging performers in challenging contemporary theatre practice.

Visit Robert the Cat’s website.

Follow Robert the Cat on Facebook.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

GYRE

GYRE

BY TORIN FRANCIS

Gyre is an exhibition of new work that comprises site responsive installations that explore liminal and transient relationships between objects that relate to weather and outdoor environments.

Through re-evaluating and re-contextualising objects that serve as instruments of measurement, such as wind turbines and barometers, Gyre considers the complexity of relations between objects, time and space.

This exhibition is informed by Francis’s ongoing interest in how objects shape our perception of time and, in particular, how a temporal interval operates as a poetic device for the indeterminate connection between past, present and future.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

21 August – 7 September 2019
Artist Talk: 
7 September, 3pm

Image credit: Span by Torin Francis, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Torin Francis

Torin Francis is a Brisbane based artist originally from London. His practice considers the devices we use to quantify, navigate, and comprehend the way in which the passing of time is perceived and experienced. This engagement with these mechanisms is explored through poetic relationships between objects and space in site-responsive installations, kinetic sculpture, assemblage, and moving image works.

Questioning the premise that an object is limited by its intended form, Francis re-evaluates and re-contextualises objects in both outdoor and indoor spaces. Natural phenomena, such as wind, weather and the environment, are used to harness outcomes, and material remnants from previous work are used in assemblages within the gallery space. Torin graduated from the Queensland University of Technology in 2017 with First Class Honours. He recently exhibited at Cut Thumb Laundry, Metro Arts ARI in residence and formed part of Future-Proof (2018) at Boxcopy Gallery.

Artist website: www.torinfrancis.net

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The project is supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland, part of the Department of Environment and Science. 

UNNAMED

UNNAMED

BY PRISCILLA BECK

Unnamed is a subtle yet immersive installation that deconstructs processes of making and exhibiting an art work, incorporating a critique of medium, material and site. Arising out of an innately self-conscious art practice, Unnamed interrogates the meaning of art-making and experience, provoking some confusion, well-trodden misgivings about art, and blind faith from the viewer. Blurring the lines between what is there, and what has been created to be there.

 

View the digital catalogue HERE.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

21 August – 7 September 2019

Image credit: Unnamed by Priscilla Beck, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Priscilla Beck

Priscilla Beck creates subtle, object based installations that work with the inherent qualities of materials and space to dictate how they will manifest.

Making associations between things and things, between materials and space, between ideas and objects, her work is self-referential to the point of nonexistence, yet retains the potential to act as allegories on the nature of things.

Through their relationship to process and material, the absence of overt didacticism, and their apparent rejection of a cohesive medium, the works are positioned to critique the space they occupy in the art world. There is an innate self-consciousness in each work that speaks to the problems of being human, and of being a human making art.

Beck currently holds a studio at Contemporary Art Tasmania, and was previously Artist in Resident at UTas School of Creative Arts. Priscilla Beck has exhibited nationally in solo and group shows, and contributed work to the inaugural HOBIENNALE in 2017.

Artist website: priscillabeck.com

 

THE CITIES, THEY TREMBLE

THE CITIES, THEY TREMBLE

BY ALEXANDRA SPENCE

The cities, they tremble is a three-part audio-visual installation that traces the connections between place, identity and sound, through an examination of resonance and vibration in everyday life.

When speaking of our ‘sounding’ environments, the distinction between the body and its environment becomes blurred—our bodies literally resonate with our surroundings through the vibration of sound. By foregrounding everyday ambient sounds, the listener becomes more aware of the sounds that are constantly being processed by their body.

The cities, they tremble examines how sound in its ephemerality allows us not simply to react to our surroundings as they appear, but offers us the opportunity to reimagine our surroundings through listening – using sound as a means to reveal the vibrancy within domestic objects and surfaces that are generally perceived to be inanimate.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

18 September – 5 October 2019

Image credit: Listening with the river by Alexandra Spence, 2016, Audain Gallery Vancouver. Photo by Lukas Engelhardt.

THE ARTIST

Alexandra Spence

Alexandra Spence is an artist and musician from Sydney, Australia. She makes installations, compositions and performances based on (everyday) sound and listening.

Alex’s art and music explores the idea of listening as active practice, examining the ways in which our individual notions of place and identity are shaped and mediated through sound. Through her practice she attempts to reimagine the intricate relationships between the listener, the object, and the surrounding environment as a kind of communion or conversation. With an interest in resonance, vibration and everyday sound, her aesthetic favours unusual sound sources: small sounds, inaudible frequencies, and object interventions (she holds the pseudo-scientific belief that electricity might actually be magic). 

Alex has performed and presented work in concerts, festivals, symposiums and galleries in Australia, Canada, and Europe, including the Vancouver Art Gallery; Engineroom International Sound-Art Competition, London; Ausland, Berlin; Le Cube, Paris; Musée Guimet, Paris; NOW Now Festival, Sydney; UNSW Galleries, Sydney; and Siteworks Festival, Bundanon (w. the Splinter Orchestra). 

Artist website: alexandraspence.net

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project was supported by the NSW Government through Create NSW.  

SHY LOVE

SHY LOVE

BY SOPHIE BOTTOMLEY

In Shy Love, Sophie Bottomley explores how the physical body experiences desire. What physical sensations do we experience when we desire someone, when we crave intimacy or touch? This exhibition will feature sculptural objects that capture moments of physical tension between two bodies. These tensions reference shared experiences of bodily pleasure and anticipation, such as flirtation, suspense, arousal, and climax. Using seductive and sensual materials, Bottomley conjures and abstracts the moment of excitation in each object.

The exhibition highlights the encounter between the masculine and feminine, where tension is heightened through contrasting materiality, the creation of interior cavities and the space between forms. The abstraction of experiences of the desiring body allows for a suggestive rather than explicit portrayal of the erotic. Articulating how thin the veil is between fantasy and reality, Shy Love exposes how the human body longs for and loses itself in its quest for pleasure.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

18 September – 5 October 2019

Image credit: The Longing by Sophie Bottomley, 2018. Image by Simon Hardy.

THE ARTIST

Sophie Bottomley

Sophie Bottomley is a Brisbane based contemporary artist working predominantly in sculpture. Bottomley’s work recalls the symbolic properties of the body and it’s associations with desire, longing, pleasure and sensation. Her art practice explores visual representations of the erotic, creating abstract sculptures that evoke a sense of the body through drooping skins and inviting interior cavities. Materials are chosen to convey sensuousness and highlight the encounter between the masculine and feminine. Each work explores a moment of tension experienced by the erotic and aroused body with a poetic simplicity.

EXPLAIN NORMAL

EXPLAIN NORMAL

BY DANIELE CONSTANCE IN COLLABORATION WITH AHA ENSEMBLE & PHLUXUS2 DANCE COLLECTIVE

There are normal ways to eat, walk, sit, speak and die.

There are also not normals, not normal ways for everything.

Not normal ways to love, to dance, to start a conversation, to cry. There are not normal ways to live.

As we all continually evolve our idea of normal, we ask what makes us part of a society and who is included? OK let’s say it – there is no such thing as normal.

Explain Normal unpacks the concept of “normal” as both survival mechanism and death making, as myth, as someone else’s truth, as a potent provocation for perspectives on society and difference, and how we value otherness.

Explain Normal is a new dance theatre work directed by participatory artist Daniele Constance. It is a new and exciting artistic collaboration between the Aha Ensemble who identify with disability and artists from Phluxus2 Dance Collective. Explain Normal explores how these artists define perceptions of normalcy, through the lens of their diverse experiences.

View the digital program HERE

KEY CREATIVES

Daniele Constance – Director
Nerida Matthaei – Choreographer
Allycia Staples – Performing Artist
Megan Louise West – Performing Artist
Rebecca Dostal – Performing Artist
Ruby Donohoe – Assisting Director & Performing Artist
Mitchell Runcie – Performing Artist
Kayah Guenther – Performing Artist
Tara Heard – Performing Artist
Charles Ball – Performing Artist
Nadia Milford – Performing Artist 
Joseph Burgess – Sound Design & AV Design
Keith Clarke – Lighting Design

Image by Jorge Serra.

DATES

17 October – 24 October + 26 October 2019, 7pm
25 October 2019, 2pm

Artist Talk: 24 October, post-show
Auslan Interpreted Performance:
26 October, 7pm

TICKETS

General Admission: $32 + booking fee
Concession: $25 + booking fee
Preview Ticket: $25 + booking fee

NOTE: Tickets for patrons in a wheelchair and Companion Card holders are not available online. Please call Metro Arts on 07 3002 7100 Monday to Friday, 9am – 4pm to enquire or make your booking. Please be aware there are only three wheelchair spaces available in the theatre.

THE ARTIST

Daniele Constance

 

Daniele Constance is a participatory artist, art therapist and producer, with a strong focus on socially engaged art making practices. She creates artistic works that draw from direct experience and storytelling, using verbatim, documentary,  contemporary and embodied performance practices. Current and past independent works include: People Of Interest (Festival of Live Art, Footscray Community Arts Centre); Public Displays of Therapy (La Boite HWY, Melbourne Fringe Festival: Testing Grounds); Daughters of the Floating Brothel (Griffith University Research Project, Brisbane Women’s Correctional Centre); The Untold (State Library of Queensland, Micah Projects); bold words from a nobody (C U R R E N T, R I S I N G), and Hear, Here site specific radio (People Artist Place, Enoggera Reservoir).

daniele-constance.squarespace.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Creative Sparks Fund is a partnership between the Queensland Government and Brisbane City Council to support local arts and culture in Brisbane. The Regional Arts Development Fund is a partnership between the Queensland Government and the City of Gold Coast Council to support local arts and culture in regional Queensland.

 

 

THE WAITRESS

THE WAITRESS

BY GEORGIA BANKS

Welcome to The Waitress, my name is Georgia Banks and I will be serving you. I will serve you. You will be served by me. What would happen if we started to talk about sex and money and food and feminism? Is that self-serving?

I’m serving you. I’m here to serve you something saucy, something sweet. What if we tried to understand the power relations between the one who serves and the one who is served? That’s a piece of meat you can really sink your teeth into.

Your waitress wants you to see this show.

 

View the digital catalogue here.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

Exhibition 13 November – 30 November 2019.

Opening Night: 6pm, 13 November 2019. 
Please note: Between 7 & 7:30 on 13 November, Georgia Banks will be performing the cherry on top. This performance includes innocuous 80’s pop music, sick dance moves, and regurgitation. While it comes highly recommended for adults, we can’t legally recommend it for children. 

THE ARTIST

Georgia Banks

Georgia Banks is a Melbourne based performance artist exploring sociological attitudes toward feminism and female sexuality through works that include interactions and provocations. Banks has a Masters of Fine Arts from Victoria College of the Arts, for which they were awarded the National Gallery of Victoria Women’s Association Award. Banks’ work has recently been exhibited as a part of South Australia’s Feminist Renewal Art Network Festival, Melbourne’s Festival of Live Art, Melbourne Fringe Festival, at The Other Art Fair, and at New York’s Parson’s School of Design.

Artist website: www.georgiabanks.net

TOWER OF BABEL

TOWER OF BABEL

BY BARAN THEATRE

“You know me as ‘Venus’ if you speak English”

Tower of Babel hosts story-telling. Persian and Australian recollections of the Transit of Venus awaken the mythology and history of the characters and the audience.

“They believed the Transit of Venus would reveal to them the height of the heavens. And the curve of this multi-lingual coastline.”

Tower of Babel hosts a Persian Party. It is Nahid and Marout’s last night in Australia before they travel to Iraq.  Nahid was a political journalist in Iran before she came to Australia as a refugee. Here, she met Marout, an eccentric documentary film-maker. They fell in love, made some plans and are about to travel together to meet the indomitable Nahid’s family.

In Tower of Babel, we meet people, eating, drinking, and dancing.  

“Bab-ili is your home too! Sing for joy there. Dwell in Happiness”.

This original interactive contemporary performance pits humanity against tyranny in our age of sanctions, war and displacement.

ONLINE PROGRAM

View the online program HERE

KEY CREATIVES

Nasim Khosravi – Co-writer, Director
Greg Manning – Co-Writer
Ben Knapton – Dramaturg
Freddy Komp – Production Designer (Light, Sound & Vision)
Jeremy Gordon – Production Stage Manager
Jason Glenwright – Lighting Design Mentor
Bernard Houston – Composer 
James Cunningham – Movement Consultant 
Hamid Sharif – Assistant Director
Niloo Tara – Costume Designer
Maryam Parsi – Singer

Performers: Afsaneh (Tina) Torabi, Steve Rooke, Anna Yen, Angus Thorburn, Peter Condon

Musicians: Pouyan Khaki, Greta Kelly, Kambiz Dara, Arash Zanganeh

The developments of the work have benefited from the insights and contributions of: Erfan Abdi, Suzon Fuks and Hosein Khosravi. 

Image design by Hosein Khosravi

DATES

20 November – 30 November 2019

This event has passed. Tickets are no longer on sale. 

THE ARTIST

Nasim Khosravi

Born in the south of Iran, Nasim has a background spanning almost twenty years in theatre, devised performance, playwriting, and directing, having graduated from Tehran University, Faculty of Fine Arts. Nasim’s work investigates potential for cross-cultural fusion and the creation of interactive theatre while keeping a poetic tone. She is specifically interested in using modern techniques to achieve a dialogue between Iranian traditional theatrical elements and contemporary theatre. In this dialogue, the modern reconstruction of classical literary works has had a significant place.

Through a feminist perspective, she has worked on her dramatisation of religious and mythological characters, which resulted in her dramatic works, drawing on characters like Mary, Sarah and Hagar. After years of study and practice in contemporary performance in Iran, Nasim founded Baran, an Iranian-Australian theatre group, in Brisbane in 2013. Baran’s first production Vis and Ramin was developed over two years premiering in 2016 at Metro Arts. Vis and Ramin was also presented at Footscray Community Arts Centre, Melbourne in 2017. Nasim is Assistant Director for Bell Shakespeare’s national tour of Julius Caesar. Nasim also creates community-based theatre works with the local Brisbane Persian community alongside her professional theatre practice.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. This project is supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland. Tower of Babel is supported by Creative Partnerships Australia through MATCH Lab.

SSHIFTT

SSHIFTT

BY KARUL PROJECTS

The ancient art of shapeshifting.

 

Human to Eagle. Eagle to Dolphin. Dolphin to Human. Human to Goanna. Goanna to Headland.

 

Shapeshifting has been happening since the beginning. Since the Dreamtime. Is it a story from past mythologies that have no place in today’s society?

 

Karul Projects weave their movement magic exploring this ancient practice and what it reveals about our identity. Can remembering the past help us better understand the present?

KEY CREATIVES

Thomas E.S. Kelly – Choreographer/Composer/Performer
Taree Sansbury – Performer/Collaborator
Caleena Sansbury – Performer/Collaborator

Acknowledgements:
This project is suported by PACT Theatre.

Hero image by Carla Zimbler.

DATES

13 May – 24 May 2019

THE ARTIST

Thomas E.S. Kelly

 

Thomas is a proud Bundjalung Yugambeh, Wiradjuri, Ni-Vanuatu man.

 

Thomas graduated in 2012 from NAISDA Dance College and has since worked with the likes of Vicki Van Hout, Shaun Parker and Company, Branch Nebula, ERTH, Chunky Move, Outer Urban Projects and Urban Theatre Projects. Thomas is currently a member of the Tasdance Makers Company.

 

His choreographic credits include his Green Room Award winning work [Mis]Conceive, Vessel for Outer Urban Projects and Shifting > Shapes.

 

Thomas creates work that explores high intensity physical works stemming from a cultural practice fused with contemporary, which incorporates voice and physical percussion. Thomas creates work to reveal subject matter that offers an opportunity to learn and develop; work that ebbs and flows whilst mimicking nature. Remembering the past to better understand the present so we can move forward into the future.

 

In 2017, Thomas created Karul Projects. A new company led by new indigenous voices telling new stories. Karul Projects is resident company at PACT.

 

For more information about Thomas and the projects he is working on and go to www.thomaseskelly.com or www.karulprojects.com