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DO YOU HEAR THE PEOPLE SING?

DO YOU HEAR THE PEOPLE SING?

CURATED BY HEIDI LEFEBVRE, KATY B PLUMMER AND LUKE LETOURNEAU

Inspired by the many versions of Les Misérables, this exhibition encompasses a kaleidoscopic range of artistic approaches to subverting and interpreting personal and historical narratives, via high-drama, excess and passion.

Each work in the exhibition both meditates on the way our culture creates memory and intervenes in how we understand ourselves within those memories. It contains works from 15 artists in various mediums, including sculpture and video.

View the digital catalogue HERE

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

30 January – 16 February 2019
Opening Night: 30 January, 6pm
Curator’s Talk: 30 January, 5:30pm

KEY CREATIVES

Artists: Liam Benson and Cassandra Bird, Dean Cross, Beth Dillon, George Haddad, Heidi Lefebvre, Daniel Mudie Cunningham, Luke O’Connor, Katy B Plummer, Em Size, Marcia Swaby, Alexander Tanazefti, Athena Thebus, Amanda Wolf and Zoe Wong.
Curators: Heidi Lefebvre, Katy B Plummer and Luke Létourneau.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Kudos Gallery and Arc @ UNSW Art & design.
This project has been supported by the Kudos Gallery and Arc @ UNSW Art & Design.

THE ARTISTS

Liam Benson

Liam Benson is a performance artist who documents his work through embroidery, photography, video and new media. Benson’s work deconstructs the social perceptions of gender, race, culture, sexuality and identity by cross-referencing art, popular culture and media language. His work serves to celebrate the evolution of these social archetypes and explore the possibilities within the cross influence of socially entrenched identities and cultural and sub-cultural amalgamation. Liam Benson is represented by Arterial Gallery, Sydney. 

Cassandra Bird

Cassandra Bird is the Asscociate Director at Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery.

Dean Cross

Dean Cross is a First Nations trans-disciplinary artist. He has been formally trained in both Contemporary Dance and Sculpture, and works across the sculptural and pictorial fields. Through this he attempts to re-evaluate and re-construct what it means to be Australian in the 21st Century, and how that fits within our globalised world. Dean was born and raised on Ngunnawal country, however his ancestral roots lie within the Worimi Nation.

Beth Dillon

Beth Dillon is a master of creative pursuits and time management. She’s an artist interested in the comic, the strange and the beautiful. Her work explores expressive ambiguities of the performing body, visual constructions of place and identity, and potential roles of the artist in contemporary society. Beth has travelled the world and uses photography, video, performance and installation to explore her subject matter. In addition to a bourgeoning solo career, Beth is also a founding member of a Sydney-based trio of emerging artists called 110%.

George Haddad

George Haddad is a Sydney based writer who is currently studying a Creative Arts Doctorate at Western Sydney University. His debut novella Populate and Perish was the winner of the 2016 Viva La Novella Prize.

Heidi Lefebvre

Heidi Lefebvre makes drawings, costumes, props and writes short plays. Exploring themes of performance and arts place in history, she cross references literary imagery with popular cultural. The results are installations that look olde worlde and drawings that simmer with narrative. Heidi can often be found spinning straw into gold. 

heidilefebvre.com

Daniel Mudie Cunningham

Daniel Mudie Cunningham is a Sydney-based artist, curator and cultural critic, active since the mid-1990s. His practice draws upon and remixes the image streams of art history, queer politics, pop culture, performance and music through video and performance.

Luke O’Connor

Luke O’Connor is a Sydney-based artist working in the medium of ceramics. Luke creates works that reference the utilitarian language embedded in the history of ceramics while presenting objects that are formally and functionally ambiguous. In reimagining the traditional ceramic ideology, with its peculiarities and willfulness, the artist both challenges and pays homage to the craft.

Katy B Plummer

Katy B Plummer makes video, sculpture and installations. She looks for the moment that fervent conviction and striving either ascends to glory, or tips into bathos. Basically, she likes high drama with its pants around its ankles. She tells complicated stories about love and revolution and she can often be found pretending to be some kind of animal.

katybplummer.com

Em Size

Em Size is an experimental non-fiction writer based in Sydney, currently interested in the infrastructures that shape the arts, relationships, sexuality and desire. Their interested in modes of writing that develop in the commons, as part of a feedback loop of reading and writing– most of their writing in some way references the utopian, DIY politico-poetics of fanfiction.

Marcia Swaby

Marcia Swaby is a contemporary jewelry maker working in Sydney. They recently completed a research project which culminated in the exhibition Haptic Tactility, at UNSw Art and Design. The works interpret unknown ancestors, inspired by her interpretation and interaction with ancient Taino statues housed in the British museum.

Alexander Tanazefti

Alexander Tanazefti is a Sydney based artist and designer interested in systems and their functions.

Athena Thebus

Athena Thebus’ practice spans sculpture, drawing, and writing. Her practice is driven by the desire to generate an atmosphere by which queer life is sustainable. Part of figuring that out is to make sculptures and installations that use materials that are connotative of capitalism’s excess, nuanced with past shame and queer hope. Presently, her writing practice involves feeling like a dog and swimming in other people’s waters. She is a Scorpio with a Sagittarius rising and a Capricorn moon.

Amanda Wolf

Amanda Wolf is a contemporary artist who engages with themes related to the body. The foundation of Wolf’s work lies in the process of hand sewing which is used to create large scale soft sculptures, costumes and stop motion animations. Wolf graduated with First Class Honours from the Queensland College of Art in 2013 and holds a Diploma of Fine Art from the Northern Melbourne Institute of Tafe (2005).

Zoe Wong

Zoe Wong’s practice explores her half Chinese, half Australian heritage as well as her queer identity through photographic appropriation and mixed media installations. Her work illustrates the complexities behind the influence that pop culture has on society’s notions of race and identity and how we perceive ourselves through representation in mass media. 

Luke Létourneau

Luke Létourneau is a writer and curator working in Sydney. His independent practice has engaged with screens cultures, genre, sweat, queer space and time and technological kurfuffles. In 2017-18 he sits on the management and editorial committee of Runway Australian Experimental Art Journal.

lukeletourneau.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project has been supported by the Kudos Gallery and Arc @ UNSW Art & Design.

A TREASURED PRIVATE NOTEBOOK

A TREASURED PRIVATE NOTEBOOK

BY THEA JONES AND ELLA SOWINSKA

A treasured private notebook responds to Ella Sowinska, and Thea Jones’ shared childhood experience of discovering the secret writing practices of their mothers.

Both Sowinska and Jones actively engage with their mother’s creative practices for this exhibition. Sowinska’s film, 80 Ways, is an observational video work documenting the on-set collaboration between the artist and her mother as they work together to dramatise a chapter of Sowinska’s mother’s erotic novel, written under the pseudonym Sandy Mayflower. Jones’ new work is a large scale textile installation responding to an essay written by her mother. In 2017, Jones approached her mother to write an essay to accompany a work exploring nostalgia as a coping mechanism for trauma. Hoping for a scathing review of family farm dynamics and conservative racist rural politics, she instead received a touching story about death, loss, and the function of nostalgia. This new work is hand embroidered with an excerpt of text from her mother’s essay, as well as the motif of the Paterson’s Curse invasive weed. Paterson’s Curse covers the landscape surrounding Thea’s mother’s childhood home with a blanket of purple flowers. It has been an ongoing theme in Jones’s recent works as a representational motif for European colonisation, and a subsequent critical investigation and deconstruction of her own role in this as a white woman.

 

View the digital catalogue HERE

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

27 February 2019 – 16 March 2019
Opening
27 February, 6pm
Artist Talk
27 February, 5:30pm

KEY CREATIVES

Artists: Thea Jones and Ella Sowinska

Essays by Rosie Funder and Diego Ramirez will accompany this exhibition.

Image Credit: 80 Ways (still) by Ella Sowinska, 2018. Image courtesy the artist.

THE ARTISTS

Ella Sowinska

Ella Sowinska is an artist and filmmaker whose work is guided by the theoretical discourses of documentary and reality television. Working predominately in video, installation and occasionally performance, Ella addresses the impact that the constructed situation has upon these social relationships. Her work explores the power dynamics between director or artist and actor, participant or contestant by drawing attention to the often-constructed situation. Recent projects have been concerned with the representation of intimacy and desire in non-fiction screen based works from a queer perspective. Ella graduated with an Honours degree in fine art from MADA at Monash University in 2013, and a Masters degree in film and television from The Victorian College of the Arts in 2018. Ella lives and works in Naarm Melbourne on the unceded sovereign land of the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation.

ellasowinska.com

Thea Jones

Thea Jones is an artist with a background in philosophy. She is broadly interested in post-structuralism and theories of language, particularly through a feminist lens. She often utilises textiles and traditional craft techniques to explore these themes. Recent projects have responded to folklore and amateur rural histories surrounding the region in NSW where her maternal family has lived for over 100 years. Recent exhibitions include: Jane’s Salvation (Paterson’s Curse) at TCB, 2017; nul at Bus Projects, 2017; and Everything Spring, curated by Julia Murphy at The Honeymoon Suite, 2017.

thea-jones.com

Rosie Funder

Rosie Funder is a non-fiction writer. Her work has been published in the Griffith Review, the Lifted Brow and un Magazine. In 2018 she was a Griffith Review fellow.
Rosie is a guest speaker at the artist talk on 27 February 5:30pm, and also contributed a catalogue essay. 

Diego Ramirez

Diego Ramirez is an artist and writer interested in terror as a response to the Other. He has held solo exhibitions and individual screenings locally and internationally at the Australian Centre for The Moving Image; MARS Gallery; and Perth Centre for Contemporary Photography. Group shows include Art Central Hong Kong; Torrance Art Museum; WRO Media Art Biennale; Hong-Gah Museum; and Careof. Ramirez’s writing features in A+a: Art and Australia; Runway Journal; and Critical Contemporary Culture Journal. He co-edited the booklet *dumb brunette vol.1. Ramirez is represented by MARS Gallery.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

LOVE ME, LOVE ME

LOVE ME, LOVE ME

BY OLIVIA LACEY

Love Me, Love Me engages with romantic dialogues as examples of intersubjective language that are repeatedly played out across pop cultural formats. The central work in the exhibition, Give Me All Your Love (2019), consists of an appropriated lyric from a love song, re-presented as an installation of hand-punched confetti suspended between clear acrylic letters. Installed alongside balloons and streamers, the confetti aims to capture a moment in time and evoke the simultaneous feelings of anticipation and disappointment that are associated with confessions of love. The work appropriates lyrics in order to explore ambiguity around the subjects of romantic confession in popular music: who is being addressed? In their open meaning these lyrics become an opportunity for the projection of our own desires.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

27 Feb – 16 March 2019
Opening 27 Feb 6pm – 8pm

Hero image credit: Confetti by Olivia Lacey, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Olivia Lacey

Olivia Lacey employs processes of transcription and translation to explore the ambiguities, slippages or humour that can arise in interpersonal interactions. Her works combine referents appropriated from art historical texts, pop music lyrics and everyday conversations in order to examine romantic dialogue as an intersubjective space of exchange. These explorations are primarily realised as multi-channel video works and wall-based text installations. She frequently employs party decorations, disco lighting and reflective materials in order to evoke the immersive spaces of karaoke rooms. Lacey graduated from a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours) at the Queensland University of Technology in 2017. In 2018, she completed a residency with 3331 Arts Chiyoda in Tokyo. Recent group exhibitions include Future Proof (2018), Boxcopy Contemporary Art Space; Hatched: National Graduate Show (2018), Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts; and Maybe We Could Meet Again (2018), 3331 Arts Chiyoda.

Artist website: olivialacey.com.au

YAAD KARO

YAAD KARO

BY SHIVANJANI LAL

Yaad Karo: To remember, to stitch together and piece fragments of history for both collective and individual remembrance. To recenter knowledge, to account for colonial and personal histories. To allow something invisible to become visible. To hold space for ancestors – past, present and future.

Yaad Karo is a new work by Shivanjani Lal which looks at the history of migration that links her personal history to the indentured labour communities of India and the Pacific. Through a process-driven practice that uses labour as a tool to account for the trajectories of labour across oceans, Lal uses stitching to create visible links that record the journeys made by her community and herself: connecting and remaking the lines of connection. In looking at shipping documents and in using a map which centres Australia between these oceans, she reframes this history by acknowledging the role of Australia as the localised colonial presence.

 

View the digital catalogue HERE.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

27 March – 13 April 2019
Opening Night:
27 March 6pm
Artist talk:
13 April 3pm, in conversation with Sancintya Mohini Simpson

Image credit: Yaad Karo by Shivanjani Lal, 2017. Image courtesy of the artist.

ARTIST

Shivanjani Lal

Shivanjani Lal is a twice removed Fijian Indian Australian artist whose history is intrinsically linked to the indentured labour diaspora of Asia and the Pacific. She works across mediums to explore her cultural dislocation, which seeks to account for memory, erasure, healing, and the archive.

Currently Lal uses spatial and material activations along with video to create documents which analyse her personal narratives in the broader context of the social history which brought her family from India to Fiji and now to Australia. This is done in an effort to redefine the history of the Indo-Fijian Community away from the narratives produced by the current political climate in both Fiji and India.

Her current research posits that history has obliterated and obfuscated the communal memory of her community but that her body and the landscapes she is from hold onto both.

Artist website: shivanjani-lal.tumblr.com

PAINTINGS

PAINTINGS

BY CHRISTINE MORROW

Christine Morrow produces multi-part painted configurations out of canvases that fasten together by means of zippers. Each component is a monochrome canvas in the tradition of reductive painting (Formalism and Minimalism). However, the accumulative work exploits the material qualities of the painter’s canvas and stretcher frame to create dynamic, three-dimensional modular structures.

Morrow’s theoretical concern is with the history of painting in the West after the late 19th century. Throughout Modernism, painting has reinstated a relationship of mutuality with the gallery wall by cultivating flatness and seriality, thereby internalising the conditions of the wall on which it is shown. Morrow carves a new space for reductive painting that embraces both acceptance and denial of gallery walls as painting’s architectural support and it’s symbolic condition or governing logic.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

27 March – 13 April 2019

THE ARTIST

Christine Morrow

Christine Morrow has held exhibitions in London, Rome and Edinburgh. In Australia, she has participated in group and solo exhibitions at Metro Arts (Brisbane), ACCA (Melbourne), CAST (Hobart), IMA (Brisbane), Performance Space (Sydney), West Space (Melbourne) and in the Adelaide Biennial (Art Gallery of South Australia). She was a finalist in the Moet and Chandon prize and a previous winner (overall) of both the Churchie Prize for emerging art and the Logan Art Award. She has undertaken international residencies through the AGNSW, the Australia Council and the Accademia Britannica; and domestic residencies at Gertrude Contemporary (Melbourne) and Artspace (Sydney).

Morrow co-founded and co-directed Blindside artist-run space in Melbourne. She curated the Australian artists for the Tenth Havana Biennial (Cuba). She has curated for institutions (Museum of Contemporary Art Sydney, Victorian Arts Centre Melbourne and Verge Gallery Sydney) as well as for festivals including the Melbourne International Festival and the Brisbane Festival.

This is Pep Too!

This is Pep Too!

BY HAILEY ATKINS

In This is Pep Too! Hailey Atkins presents a body of new sculptural works and drawings that revise the meaning of ‘pep’ to incorporate the reality of failure and anxiety. Drawing on the personal and borrowing from the everyday, Atkins uses playful colour and form to articulate experiences that occur at the intersection of failure, doubt and defiant enthusiasm. Where naïve motivational rhetoric marches blindly forward, and smirking satire marches stubbornly on the spot, the work in This Is Pep Too! huffs and huddles and meanders. It thrusts its hand skyward and just as quickly retracts and takes cover. It offers an alternate version of the world where the awkwardness and absurdity of ‘not-knowing’ is embraced and expectation is given the flick.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS:
There will also be additional FREE events on 18th May as part of BAD 2019, including an artist talk and screening – ALL WELCOME!

Screening of Postcard eXotica by Diego Ramirez / Saturday 18th May, 1pm in Metro Arts Gallery 2
Postcard eXotica is a 30 minute cinematic re-enactment of a collection of vintage American postcards produced circa 1900-1930s that depict Mexican stereotypes. The work seeks to think through the Western gaze by approaching the pictures as movie scenes and revealing the condition of their making – particularly the way they are scripted, staged, lit and filmed. In a broader manner, the video pastiches early cinema, contemporary pop and horror to trace the ways in which these ideas manifest today.

Artist Talks / Saturday 18th May, 2-3pm in Metro Arts Gallery
Meet and hear from the studio artists and visiting artists at Metro Arts. Join Hailey Atkins for a casual tour of her exhibition and hear about the ideas and processes that inform her practice. Following the tour, join local artist Anastasia Booth, and visiting Melbourne-based artist Diego Ramirez as part of an in-conversation series.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

8 May – 25 May 2019

Image credit: Trophy for potato by Hailey Atkins, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Hailey Atkins

 

Hailey is a Brisbane based sculptural artist. She graduated at Queensland College of Art in 2016 (Bachelor of Fine Art, Hons – Class I) and has since exhibited frequently in Queensland, as well as interstate (Sydney, Hobart) and internationally (Utrecht, Rotterdam, NL) and is currently represented by har.art in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Hailey was selected as a finalist of Churchie Emerging Art Prize in 2018 and is co- founder and director of Wreckers Artspace in Brisbane.

 

Artist Website: haileyatkins.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We’re BAD | This event is part of BRISBANE ART DESIGN (BAD) 2019, an initiative of Museum of Brisbane.

MARS Video Exchange  

MARS Video Exchange  

BY STEPHEN HALEY, HANNAH RAISIN AND DIEGO RAMIREZ

As part of an exchange with Melbourne-based gallery MARS, Metro Arts will present the work of three innovative Melbourne video artists: Stephen Haley, Hannah Raisin and Diego Ramirez, and curated by Amanda Camp. In November 2019, a selection of Brisbane artists, curated by Metro Arts, will be exhibited in the Black Box, the dedicated video projection space at MARS, Melbourne.

The four video works exhibited at Metro Arts, by three distinctive artists, are united by an interest in our physical environments. Stephen Haley’s new video work Fugue State(2019) uses computer-generated modelling to fly-through abstractions of shopping centres, cityscapes and housing development. In contrast to the disembodied gaze of Haley’s work, Hannah Raisin and Diego Ramirez emphasises bodily engagements with our surroundings. Raisin’s works Soak I and SOAK II show the artist traversing a waterfall, before plunging into the water, capturing the visceral enveloping of the body by the environment. Ramirez’s work, aXolotl’s Happiness, again emphasises the body, and the banality of our interactions within the domestic space, even as this body enters the realm of the fantastic.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS:
There will also be additional FREE events on 18th May as part of BAD 2019, including an artist talk and screening – ALL WELCOME!

Screening of Postcard eXotica by Diego Ramirez / Saturday 18th May, 1pm in Metro Arts Gallery 2
Postcard eXotica is a 30 minute cinematic re-enactment of a collection of vintage American postcards produced circa 1900-1930s that depict Mexican stereotypes. The work seeks to think through the Western gaze by approaching the pictures as movie scenes and revealing the condition of their making – particularly the way they are scripted, staged, lit and filmed. In a broader manner, the video pastiches early cinema, contemporary pop and horror to trace the ways in which these ideas manifest today.

Artist Talks / Saturday 18th May, 2-3pm in Metro Arts Gallery
Meet and hear from the studio artists and visiting artists at Metro Arts. Join Hailey Atkins for a casual tour of her exhibition and hear about the ideas and processes that inform her practice. Following the tour, join local artist Anastasia Booth, and visiting Melbourne-based artist Diego Ramirez as part of an in-conversation series.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

8 May – 25 May 2019

Image credit: Diego Ramirez. ‘Postcard eXotica’ 2016. HD Video 30 minutes Edition of 5 + 2AP. Courtesy the artist and MARS (Melbourne).

THE ARTISTS

Hannah Raisin

After completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Victorian College of the Arts in 2007, Hannah Raisin returned for Honours in 2012. For a decade she has continued to engage her playful and subversive performance based practice in numerous group shows, solo exhibitions and other forums throughout Australia. In 2013 and 2014 Raisin was the recipient of Art Start and New Work Grants from the Australia Council, which funded a self-directed arts program throughout various locations in regional and urban Australia. In early 2017, Raisin undertook an Asialink Arts residency to Bangalore, India where she produced the video work Spectrum. Raisin has recently been curated into group show Unfinished Buisness: Perspectives on Art and Feminism at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA) with her video work‘Fold.

Stephen Haley

Stephen Haley is a painter and digital media artist who has an extensive exhibition history – both nationally and internationally – and has won a number of national art prizes for painting. Selected awards and research grants include Australia Council’s New Work Grant, their LA Residency, an Arts Vic Project Grant, and most recently The Rupert Bunny Fellowship in 2016. Haley is also a writer and is published in a wide range of forums.

Diego Ramirez

Diego Ramirez is an emerging multidisciplinary artist and writer. He works primarily with video and other forms of media in the pursuit of developing installation projects for gallery contexts. His research based practice seeks to reconfigure representations of racial difference in lens based media. Ramirez’s most recent work is prompted by found images that embody the fear and desire that characterises projections of the Other. Indeed, his research interests are currently being developed in two streams of practice; delegated performances scripted for cinematic videos and pictures produced with vector graphics. The first attempts to think through the way in which the body is staged and the latter the manner in which it is designed. Neither idealist nor entirely cynical, the artist’s goal is to scramble the script that dictates power relations in visual culture. Ramirez’s method is best described as active reading, a calculated effort to generate alternative and counter readings of dominant texts. This methodology intends to provoke moments of recognition in which the mechanisms of the text become apparent and null.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We’re BAD | This event is part of BRISBANE ART DESIGN (BAD) 2019, an initiative of Museum of Brisbane.

LIFE ON EARTH

LIFE ON EARTH

BY EMMA LINDSAY

Life on Earth recreates the artist’s intense moments with wild species, encountered during global fieldtrips to desert, Arctic, reef and museum sites between 2011-2018.

Emma Lindsay grew up believing that environments untouched by humanity still existed on Earth, based on David Attenborough’s nature TV documentaries. Later, the artist was heartbroken to learn Attenborough’s ‘Nature’ was an aesthetic camera-constructed illusion, with all traces of humans carefully edited out of the frame. Lindsay reframes Life on Earth to include her observations of the sixth mass extinction crisis, climate change, and the ongoing impact of unlimited human activities on the Biosphere.

The exhibition will offer conversations about biodiversity and geographic zones at risk of disappearing, utilizing a diverse range of art media: an invitation to consider care and complicity in the intersection between art, science, culture, and all Life on Earth.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

5 June – 15 June 2019
Artist Talk: Saturday, 15 June 3pm

Image credit: Borderlines by Emma Lindsay, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Emma Lindsay

Dr Emma Lindsay is a visual artist and occasional curator. Lindsay’s paintings and interdisciplinary projects explore personal encounters with threatened, endangered and extinct species and the impact of human culture and activities upon their habitats and existence during this time of the Anthropocene.

Overall winner of the 2016 Moreton Bay Art Awards, Lindsay has been a finalist in the Sunshine Coast Art Prize, Churchie Emerging Art Award, Redlands Westpac Art Prize, and the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize. The artist has been awarded residencies with: BAER Art Centre Artist Center (Iceland); Bathurst Regional Art Gallery Hill End Murray’s Cottage Residency, and Point B Worklodge (New York). Since 2009 she has also been awarded major grants from the Australia Council, Australian American Association, Arts Queensland, Brisbane City Council, and an RMIT Post-Graduate scholarship. Lindsay’s work is held in public and private collections in Australia and internationally.

Artist website: www.emmalindsay.com

WE KOPPEL, WE DALA

WE KOPPEL, WE DALA

BY ROBERTA RICH

We Koppel, We Dala presents narratives of southern African origins that explore concepts of identity, migration, self-determination and representation. Painful artefacts remind us of oppressive histories and their ongoing impacts. Apartheid continues. Disguised globally. Framed within South African Apartheid history, the exhibition seeks to consider adjacent histories of colonialism such as that of so-called ‘Australia’ and its own histories of segregation, and to acknowledge this.

We Koppel, We Dala explores personal relationships within these histories, by occupying significant sites of reclamation and loss: the mountains where Khoi and San ancestors traversed; memorials of the 76’ youth uprisings; sites of removed colonial statues; and visiting former family residences. Fist thrust into the air, the artist acknowledges connection to place and history. The plight of residents of District Six and many other communities who were displaced as a result of South Africa’s Group Areas Act, continues 50 years on, though not in silence. Because we must koppel, we must dala.

WHERE

Gallery

WHEN

26 June – 13 July 2019

Image credit: M/otherLand by RobertaRich, 2018. Image by Lyndon Campbell

THE ARTIST

Roberta Rich

Roberta Rich draws from historical, socio-political, media and popular culture to engage with notions of ‘authenticity’, its relationship to constructed identities, and their forms of representation. In doing so, Rich aims to de-construct colonial modalities through arts practice while ascertaining empowering forms of self-determination, often referencing her diaspora African identity and experiences.

Since completing her MFA at Monash University (2013), Rich has exhibited projects in Melbourne, interstate and across Johannesburg and Cape Town. Recent solo shows include: Bubblegum Club  (Johannesburg, 2016); Blak Dot Gallery (Melbourne, 2017); Next Wave Festival (Arts House, 2018); Bus Projects (2018), and group exhibitions at Wits Art Museum (Johannesburg, 2017); Klein Karoo Nasionale Kunstefees (Western Cape, 2017); Firstdraft, (Sydney, 2018), and Gallery MOMO (Cape Town, 2018). Rich is an alumni of Footscray Community Art Centre’s Emerging Cultural Leaders Program. Rich’s recent residencies in South Africa were supported by NAVA’s Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship for Emerging Artists.

Artist website: www.robertajoyrich.com

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

M/other Land is supported by Next Wave and the City of Melbourne through Arts House. The project was assisted by The Freedman Foundation Travelling Scholarship. The program is administered by the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA). 

THE BOY DIVER

THE BOY DIVER

BY ALEX PYREN

The Boy Diver continues Alex Pyren’s interest in playfully reflecting on lived experiences, reconstructing and transforming encounters from their childhood and moments from their daily life. Here, the artist returns to their tenth birthday party, where they would find a treasure at the bottom of a public pool: a $1 coin. The exhibition focuses, not on obtaining the coin, but on reaching for it and the potentiality of this moment of endeavour and expectation. As the coin’s glint is followed through the water, the uncertainty of the moment suggests a flow of energies, yet to be regulated, that have unrestricted potential.  The artist’s body is implied in this recreation of a memory but is not made concrete, and also inhabits this shifting ground of potential, rather than certainty. The exhibition’s traces do not monumentalise the event.  Instead, the distorted lens of the water emphasises the shifting ground of memory, and the work inhabits the uncertain interstice between the real and imagined.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

26 June – 13 July 2019

Image credit: The Boy Diver by Alex Pyren, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Alex Pyren

Alex Pyren is a Brisbane based interdisciplinary artist who works across sculpture, installation, video and drawing. Their practice is informed by methods and theories of play and the whimsical, queer theory and lived experience.

Alex is interested in playfully exploring invocations of the body in relation to objects and spatial-temporal events and interrogating the visibility and interferences of queer identities in private and public space.

Artist website: www.alexpyren.com

FLASH LIGHTS IN LOW VISIBILITY

FLASH LIGHTS IN LOW VISIBILITY

BY NICHOLETE BROCCHI

Flash Lights in Low Visibility investigates the detachment of incarcerated members of our community, who are never returned to full citizenship.  The exhibition is concerned with the way that the legal framework and isolation of prison reproduces specific individualizing and moralizing systems. Heightened rates of Indigenous and transgender incarceration undermine the validity of these systems. In considering these imbalances, the work also draws attention to the organization of space as a force for policing binaries, and for determining both the hyper-visibility and the invisibility of non-binary individuals. 

 

View the digital catalogue HERE

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

July 24 –  August 10 2019

Image credit: Image courtesy of the artist.

ADDITIONAL EVENTS

ARTIST TALK / Saturday 10 August, 3pm

PUBLIC PROGRAM / Saturday 10 August, 4pm
Please note this event has been rescheduled to Sat 10 August 4pm. We apologise for any inconvenience.

Expanding on the themes of the exhibition, the Queer College of Art will be joined in conversation with Samantha Pilkington and Emil Canita. Queer College of Art is an informal, community-driven space, which welcomes all participants in a supportive environment. 

THE ARTIST

Nicholete Brocchi


Nicholete Brocchi is a Meanjin (Brisbane) based artist working predominantly with installation, video and sculptural assemblage. Their practice operates within a post-natural matrix wherein no element of the cognitive or material realm is fixed or permanent. Their experimentation across this range of media highlights the inherent plasticity of sex and gender identity by contributing to feminist narratives from a queer perspective. Recent installations attempt to expose the private sphere as a site of heterosexual privilege and queer oppression. Demanding the right to speak as no one in particular, their intimate and vulnerable explorations of identity transcend the limits of the personal and the particular in an effort to look to new modes of queer representation.

Artist website: nicholasbrocchi.com

SILICA

SILICA

BY GRACE BLAKE

Silica is an exhibition by Grace Blake that explores hypothetical bodies. Considering silicon dioxide – a compound found in various living things – as a common thread connecting ancient and future organic, artificial and hybridised life on earth, this exhibition seeks to establish commonality between human and nonhuman beings. Drawing from non correlationist thought and new perspectives on ecology, as discussed by Donna Haraway, Timothy Morton and Steven Shaviro, this exhibition acts to extrapolate a near post anthropocene future where human ruins house new life. By removing the human as central to the exploration of the present and future experience of life on earth, Silica will strive to craft a speculative reality and examine what is compelling about creating science fiction futures.   

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

24 July – 10 August 2019

Image credit: Cuts by Grace Blake, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Grace Blake

Grace Blake is an emerging digital media and installation artist based in Canberra. Central to her practice is the tension between the virtual and tangible, developed by using 3D modelling and editing software to generate hypothetical architecture and objects, which are increasingly placed within accompanying installations. Using a number of digital and fabrication technologies, Blake considers her cross disciplinary practice an act of creating speculative realities and questions what is compelling about creating science fiction futures. While studying at ANU school of Art and Design, Blake has exhibited extensively in Sydney and Canberra and is the programs manager of Canberra-based ARI Tributary projects.

GYRE

GYRE

BY TORIN FRANCIS

Gyre is an exhibition of new work that comprises site responsive installations that explore liminal and transient relationships between objects that relate to weather and outdoor environments.

Through re-evaluating and re-contextualising objects that serve as instruments of measurement, such as wind turbines and barometers, Gyre considers the complexity of relations between objects, time and space.

This exhibition is informed by Francis’s ongoing interest in how objects shape our perception of time and, in particular, how a temporal interval operates as a poetic device for the indeterminate connection between past, present and future.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

21 August – 7 September 2019
Artist Talk: 
7 September, 3pm

Image credit: Span by Torin Francis, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Torin Francis

Torin Francis is a Brisbane based artist originally from London. His practice considers the devices we use to quantify, navigate, and comprehend the way in which the passing of time is perceived and experienced. This engagement with these mechanisms is explored through poetic relationships between objects and space in site-responsive installations, kinetic sculpture, assemblage, and moving image works.

Questioning the premise that an object is limited by its intended form, Francis re-evaluates and re-contextualises objects in both outdoor and indoor spaces. Natural phenomena, such as wind, weather and the environment, are used to harness outcomes, and material remnants from previous work are used in assemblages within the gallery space. Torin graduated from the Queensland University of Technology in 2017 with First Class Honours. He recently exhibited at Cut Thumb Laundry, Metro Arts ARI in residence and formed part of Future-Proof (2018) at Boxcopy Gallery.

Artist website: www.torinfrancis.net

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The project is supported by the Queensland Government through Arts Queensland, part of the Department of Environment and Science. 

UNNAMED

UNNAMED

BY PRISCILLA BECK

Unnamed is a subtle yet immersive installation that deconstructs processes of making and exhibiting an art work, incorporating a critique of medium, material and site. Arising out of an innately self-conscious art practice, Unnamed interrogates the meaning of art-making and experience, provoking some confusion, well-trodden misgivings about art, and blind faith from the viewer. Blurring the lines between what is there, and what has been created to be there.

 

View the digital catalogue HERE.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

21 August – 7 September 2019

Image credit: Unnamed by Priscilla Beck, 2018. Image courtesy of the artist.

THE ARTIST

Priscilla Beck

Priscilla Beck creates subtle, object based installations that work with the inherent qualities of materials and space to dictate how they will manifest.

Making associations between things and things, between materials and space, between ideas and objects, her work is self-referential to the point of nonexistence, yet retains the potential to act as allegories on the nature of things.

Through their relationship to process and material, the absence of overt didacticism, and their apparent rejection of a cohesive medium, the works are positioned to critique the space they occupy in the art world. There is an innate self-consciousness in each work that speaks to the problems of being human, and of being a human making art.

Beck currently holds a studio at Contemporary Art Tasmania, and was previously Artist in Resident at UTas School of Creative Arts. Priscilla Beck has exhibited nationally in solo and group shows, and contributed work to the inaugural HOBIENNALE in 2017.

Artist website: priscillabeck.com

 

THE CITIES, THEY TREMBLE

THE CITIES, THEY TREMBLE

BY ALEXANDRA SPENCE

The cities, they tremble is a three-part audio-visual installation that traces the connections between place, identity and sound, through an examination of resonance and vibration in everyday life.

When speaking of our ‘sounding’ environments, the distinction between the body and its environment becomes blurred—our bodies literally resonate with our surroundings through the vibration of sound. By foregrounding everyday ambient sounds, the listener becomes more aware of the sounds that are constantly being processed by their body.

The cities, they tremble examines how sound in its ephemerality allows us not simply to react to our surroundings as they appear, but offers us the opportunity to reimagine our surroundings through listening – using sound as a means to reveal the vibrancy within domestic objects and surfaces that are generally perceived to be inanimate.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

18 September – 5 October 2019

Image credit: Listening with the river by Alexandra Spence, 2016, Audain Gallery Vancouver. Photo by Lukas Engelhardt.

THE ARTIST

Alexandra Spence

Alexandra Spence is an artist and musician from Sydney, Australia. She makes installations, compositions and performances based on (everyday) sound and listening.

Alex’s art and music explores the idea of listening as active practice, examining the ways in which our individual notions of place and identity are shaped and mediated through sound. Through her practice she attempts to reimagine the intricate relationships between the listener, the object, and the surrounding environment as a kind of communion or conversation. With an interest in resonance, vibration and everyday sound, her aesthetic favours unusual sound sources: small sounds, inaudible frequencies, and object interventions (she holds the pseudo-scientific belief that electricity might actually be magic). 

Alex has performed and presented work in concerts, festivals, symposiums and galleries in Australia, Canada, and Europe, including the Vancouver Art Gallery; Engineroom International Sound-Art Competition, London; Ausland, Berlin; Le Cube, Paris; Musée Guimet, Paris; NOW Now Festival, Sydney; UNSW Galleries, Sydney; and Siteworks Festival, Bundanon (w. the Splinter Orchestra). 

Artist website: alexandraspence.net

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project was supported by the NSW Government through Create NSW.  

SHY LOVE

SHY LOVE

BY SOPHIE BOTTOMLEY

In Shy Love, Sophie Bottomley explores how the physical body experiences desire. What physical sensations do we experience when we desire someone, when we crave intimacy or touch? This exhibition will feature sculptural objects that capture moments of physical tension between two bodies. These tensions reference shared experiences of bodily pleasure and anticipation, such as flirtation, suspense, arousal, and climax. Using seductive and sensual materials, Bottomley conjures and abstracts the moment of excitation in each object.

The exhibition highlights the encounter between the masculine and feminine, where tension is heightened through contrasting materiality, the creation of interior cavities and the space between forms. The abstraction of experiences of the desiring body allows for a suggestive rather than explicit portrayal of the erotic. Articulating how thin the veil is between fantasy and reality, Shy Love exposes how the human body longs for and loses itself in its quest for pleasure.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

18 September – 5 October 2019

Image credit: The Longing by Sophie Bottomley, 2018. Image by Simon Hardy.

THE ARTIST

Sophie Bottomley

Sophie Bottomley is a Brisbane based contemporary artist working predominantly in sculpture. Bottomley’s work recalls the symbolic properties of the body and it’s associations with desire, longing, pleasure and sensation. Her art practice explores visual representations of the erotic, creating abstract sculptures that evoke a sense of the body through drooping skins and inviting interior cavities. Materials are chosen to convey sensuousness and highlight the encounter between the masculine and feminine. Each work explores a moment of tension experienced by the erotic and aroused body with a poetic simplicity.

VIDEO VISIONS

VIDEO VISIONS

PRESENTED BY CHANNELS FESTIVAL & METRO ARTS

Video Visions is Channels Festival’s flagship open-call video art program, running since the inaugural festival in 2013.

Presented as a feature-length screening, the 2019 Video Visions program showcases a curated selection of recently created, single-channel works that highlights the energy and breadth of contemporary video art.

The 2019 screening will feature video by Gianluca Abbate (Italy), Pablo-Martín Córdoba (Argentina/ France), CROSSLUCID, (Poland/Hungary/Germany), Di Hu (China/Ireland), Maren Dagny Juell (Norway), Deborah Kelly (AU), Sonia Leber(AU), Juyi Mao (China), Alison Nguyen (USA), Caroline Rumley, (USA), Ella Parkes-Talbot (AU), Devis Venturelli (Italy), and Sophie Penkethman-Young (AU).

The works were selected by a panel of Australian video artists and curators from hundreds of submissions from around the globe.

 

VIEWER WARNING

Video Visions screening may potentially trigger seizures for people with photosensitive epilepsy. Viewer discretion is advised. If you have concerns please contact Channels: hello@channelsfestival.net.au

WHERE

Epson Lumen Room, Metro Arts

WHEN

23 September 2019, 7 – 9pm

Image credit: Sophie Penkethman-YoungWoolworths orchid, 2019. Courtesy of the artists.

PRICE 

FREE!

THE ARTIST

Di Hu

Di Hu is a video artist and film researcher based in Shanghai and Dublin. He studied Chinese Literature at Zhejiang University before going on to study cinema at several universities in Paris (Paris 1, Paris 7 and Paris 3). His work across film, video and photography investigate the legacies of the cinema through the interpretation of forms, codes and narratives of films by means of art-making. His practice also engages with film language as gestures to demystify complex social-political constructions, especially those embedded in Chinese society.

CROSSLUCID

Currently based in Berlin, CROSSLUCID is a cross-disciplinary collective and the synthesis of Sylwana Zybura and Tomas C. Toth. Appearing in a transitional reality its aim is to instigate new associations and investigate novel arrangements. Its current practice spans moving image, photography, collage, installation, character design and creative direction. CROSSLUCID accelerates the intersection between realities with their combinations of multifaceted visual systems, experience-led interventions and performative practices.

Pablo-Martín Córdoba

After a first autodidact artistic experience followed by studies in Art History and Contemporary Art and Photography, Pablo-Martín Córdoba structures his work around the notions of temporality and movement. In his practice, the spatiotemporal domain is expanded through a free exploration of digital technologies, its possibilities and its limits. Through photomontages, videos and installations, the artist proposes a particular vision of reality, without excluding shifts towards fiction. Currently based in France, his work has been exhibited in Europe, America and Asia.

Caroline Rumley

Caroline Rumley is an American filmmaker and visual artist who combines solo-shot film, found and archival footage, text, and sound to process a public or personal experience. Her experimental, documentary, and poetry films have screened at venues internationally including Sundance, Athens International Film and Video, Anti-Matter, Haverhill, Blue Danube, the Zebra, Film-Poem, Indie Cork Ó Bhéal, and Juteback Poetry Film Festivals, the Atlanta Film Festival, and the Houston Center for Photography. A video-based body of her work is included on Charlotte Cotton’s “Best of 2017” list in the British Journal of Photography.

Ella Parkes-Talbot

Australian artist Ella Parkes-Talbot is an emerging thinker living on stolen land in the Eora nation. She is the chief pathogen of ULTRAVIRUS, a multi-tentacled project concerned with exploring, interrogating, and celebrating the internet. Operating under an ethos of ‘edutainment’, ULTRAVIRUS recognises that learning and dancing are two sides of the same bitcoin. ULTRAVIRUS takes place URL, through social media channels (but is working on deplatforming); and AFK (away from keyboard) – as a one day mini-festival of ideas and cyber-informed, boundary-pushing electronic music. When Parkes-Talbot is not falling through hyperlinked vortexes and mining the web for ideas, she is completing her law degree and working in criminal defence.

Maren Dagny Juell

Maren Dagny Juell is a Norwegian artist working in moving image, installation and Virtual Reality. Interested in means of control, command and instruction, her work explores the format of the video tutorial and VR works where the fragility of the body in VR and the (current) inclusion of the hardware and tech is included as an essential part of the work. She received her MA from Chelsea College of Art, London in 2004 and has exhibited widely in Norway, including solo shows at Trafo Kunsthall, Trøndelag Senter For Samtidskunst, Akershus Kunstnersenter, Podium Oslo and group shows at Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art and Stavanger Kunstmuseum. Juell also co-runs the artist-run space She Will with Liv Tandrevold Eriksen and teaches moving image and installation at Einar Granum School of Art.

Deborah Kelly

Deborah Kelly is a Melbourne-born, Sydney-based artist whose works have been shown around Australia, and in the Biennales of Singapore, Sydney, Thessaloniki, Tarra Warra and Venice. Her projects across media are concerned with lineages of representation, politics and history in public exchange, and practices of collectivity on small and large scale. Her new work is an experiment in models of sustained creative collaboration between strangers.

The Gods of Tiny Things emerged from a durational open-call workshop at Bundanon Trust. The animated entities were devised by participants Joanne Albany, Alana Ambados, Kate Andrews, Justin Ashworth, Kathryn Bird, Karen Golland, Amanda Holt, Kath Lim, Lex Lindsay, Megan Rushton, Rie Tamaoke and Anna Tregloan.

Juyi Mao

Juyi Mao is a filmmaker, writer, and composer. Born in Hefei, China, in 1991, Mao earned a Bachelor of Arts from Xiamen University in 2013, and an MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art with focuses on new media, critical theory, and cinema study. In his films, installations, and performances, Mao queries and investigates the relationships of people, space and objects within contexts of contemporary life and socio-political conditions. His work has been screened and exhibited internationally, including Anthology Film Archives, New York City; La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club, New York City; CAFA Art Museum, Beijing; CICA Museum, Gimpo; Space Camp, Baltimore; T Sheila & Richard Riggs Gallery, Baltimore; SANDAO Museum, Xiamen; among others. His work has been featured in Modern Weekly. He lives and works in Long Island City, New York.

Sonia Leber & David Chesworth

Sonia Leber and David Chesworth are known for their distinctive installation artworks, using video, sound, architecture and public participation. Developed through expansive research in places undergoing social change, Leber and Chesworth’s works are speculative and archaeological, responding to architectural, social and technological settings. Based in Melbourne, the pair have exhibited internationally in Greece, Poland, Sweden, Russia, New Zealand, and were included in the 56th Biennale of Venice, Italy. The pair have had numerous group and solo exhibitions in galleries across Australia and were awarded the Substation Contemporary Art Prize (2016); Gold Coast Art Prize (2014); and Screengrab International Media Arts Award (2014). Their work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw, Poland; Art Gallery of Western Australia; and National Gallery of Victoria.

Sophie Penkethman-Young

Sophie Penkethman-Young is interested in the mass consumption of digital and natural objects, and how ideas and experiences translate digitally. Her works have been included in exhibitions across Australia, Hong Kong, USA, Europe and the UK. Penkethman-Young has been a finalist in several prizes including The Churchie National Emerging Art Prize, QUT Art Museum, Brisbane (2018) and the Fisher’s Ghost Art Award Campbelltown Arts Centre, Sydney (2017). She has worked collaboratively with dancer and artist Amrita Hepi on The Ropes (2019) and A Caltex Spectrum (2018). In 2016 the artist worked with Amrita Hepi and Jahra Wasasala on Passing, which was presented in association with Darebin Arts and Next Wave Festival. Penkethman-Young is the Digital Manager of Runway Australian Experimental Art and is currently completing a Master of Art Curating at the University of Sydney, focusing on digital museum culture and internet-based practice.

Devis Venturelli

Devis Venturelli is a multi-disciplinary artist and architect based in Italy In his practice he uses the languages of video, performance, sculpture and installation to document ephemeral architectures and temporary utopias. He has taken part in solo and group shows in museums, institutions and art galleries such as Centre Pompidou, Paris; Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York; Antology Film Archive, New York; PAC, Milan; Medialab-Prado, Madrid; Museo de Arte, Lima; Xinjiang Biennale; MACRO, Rome; Kulturhuset Museum, Stockholm; MMOMA – Moscow Museum of Modern Art , Moscow; la Biennale di Venezia; Ace Gallery, Los Angeles; Angel Orensanz Foundation, New York; Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Amsterdam; Spazio Oberdan, Milan; Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin; Kunsthalle, Wien; Stadtgalerie, Kiel; Centre d’Art Santa Monica, Barcelona; Fondazione Merz, Turin; Kunstverein, Augsburg; Pacific Design Center, West Hollywood; National Museum, Wrocław; Mart – Galleria Civica, Trento; Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna, Rome. His videos and experimental films have been shown in International Film Festivals and have been awarded prizes including the Premio Aletti – Banca Aletti; VIDEO.it / Fondazione Merz; and the Hong Kong Arthouse Prize – Best Experimental Film.

Gianluca Abbate

Gianluca Abbate is an Italian video artist and filmmaker based in Rome. His works have been shown at national and international museums and exhibitions, including at the Macro Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome, the Torrance Art Museum, at the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, at Maxxi Museo Nazionale delle Arti del XXI secolo, at Palais de Tokyo; and at MMoma Moscow Museum of Modern Art. His work has been shown at more than 20 film and video art festivals in the USA, Italy, France, Poland, Greece and Australia and his works have been broadcasted on ARTE TV. He has won awards including the Silver Ribbon (Nasto d’Argento) by the Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists, the best short film at TFF32 (Torino Film Festival), awards at Videoformes in Clermont-Ferrand (FR) at Visioni Italiane in Bologna, and a special mention at Genova Film Festival.

Alison Nguyen

Alison Nguyen’s work explores the ways in which images are produced, disseminated, and consumed within the current media landscape, exposing the socio-political conditions from which they arise. Creating strategies for dissent, she re-articulates mainstream cinematic language in unsettlingly seductive installation, video, and sculptural works that generate a self-aware gaze within which the viewer becomes both producer and consumer of their own spectacle. Her work has been screened at Ann Arbor Film Festival, Crossroads presented by SF MoMA/SF Cinemateque, True/False Film Festival, Microscope Gallery, Tai Kwun Contemporary, Leeds International Film Festival, San Diego Underground Film Festival, Maryland Film Festival, Unseen Film Festival, Marfa Film Festival, L’Alternativa at CCCB, and Traverse Vidéo, among others. Her work has been exhibited at AC Gallery Beijing, Centre Des Arts Actuels Skol, Chashama, BOSI Contemporary, The University of Oklahoma, and Satellite Art Show, Miami.

THE WAITRESS

THE WAITRESS

BY GEORGIA BANKS

Welcome to The Waitress, my name is Georgia Banks and I will be serving you. I will serve you. You will be served by me. What would happen if we started to talk about sex and money and food and feminism? Is that self-serving?

I’m serving you. I’m here to serve you something saucy, something sweet. What if we tried to understand the power relations between the one who serves and the one who is served? That’s a piece of meat you can really sink your teeth into.

Your waitress wants you to see this show.

 

View the digital catalogue here.

WHERE

Main Gallery

WHEN

Exhibition 13 November – 30 November 2019.

Opening Night: 6pm, 13 November 2019. 
Please note: Between 7 & 7:30 on 13 November, Georgia Banks will be performing the cherry on top. This performance includes innocuous 80’s pop music, sick dance moves, and regurgitation. While it comes highly recommended for adults, we can’t legally recommend it for children. 

THE ARTIST

Georgia Banks

Georgia Banks is a Melbourne based performance artist exploring sociological attitudes toward feminism and female sexuality through works that include interactions and provocations. Banks has a Masters of Fine Arts from Victoria College of the Arts, for which they were awarded the National Gallery of Victoria Women’s Association Award. Banks’ work has recently been exhibited as a part of South Australia’s Feminist Renewal Art Network Festival, Melbourne’s Festival of Live Art, Melbourne Fringe Festival, at The Other Art Fair, and at New York’s Parson’s School of Design.

Artist website: www.georgiabanks.net

ASSET PACK

ASSET PACK

BY BADEN PAILTHORPE

In Asset Pack, 2019, Baden Pailthorpe intensifies his examination of the cultures of late capitalism by reinterpreting the material culture of digital marketplaces. In doing so, he recontextualises these objects and redefines their potential as artefacts of our contemporary moment. Like an archaeologist unearthing speculative objects from the networks that increasingly define our lives, these artworks speak to the complex and unstable nature of society today.   

Digital marketplaces define our contemporary experience – they represent billions of dollars of trade, yet are almost entirely immaterial. Data is the lifeblood of capitalism – from Russian disinformation campaigns targeting US elections, Facebook’s Libra digital currency, Chinese ‘click farms’, facial recognition datasets and robodebt algorithms – all of these converge to create complex forms of power and capital. Assets in this context are not only tradable commodities, they are the neo-relics of our age.         

This exhibition is in itself an ‘asset pack’, since it becomes modular and deployable for any kind of exhibition space. Metro Arts presents a scale version of the exhibition, focused on the moving image components of the work.

WHERE

Gallery 2

WHEN

13 – 30 November 2019
Opening night: 
13 November, 6pm

CREDITS

Image: Gunz, 2019. Unreal Engine plants asset pack, 4K Ultra HD real-time animation. Ed 3 + 2AP

THE ARTIST

Baden Pailthorpe

Baden Pailthorpe is a contemporary artist who works with emerging and experimental technologies. He is the Convenor of Hybrid Art Practice at the ANU School of Art & Design, Canberra. His artistic practice interrogates the relationship between aesthetics and power, interrogating the politics of technological and economic structures across Sport, Finance and the Military-Industrial Complex.

Since 2011, Baden’s practice has integrated performance and installation alongside screen-based interventions. Examples include: a commissioned performance at the Centre Pompidou, Paris (2014); video work depicting a hacked military simulator at the Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2012); documentation of a video game performance exhibited at the Triennale di Milano, Milan (2016); a ‘start-up as artwork’ at Sullivan+Strumpf (2017); and an experimental data visualisation of AFL player GPS data at UTS Art, Sydney (2017).

Baden Pailthorpe is represented by Sullivan+ Strumpf.